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Marinade

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Marinade

Marination is the process of soaking foods in a seasoned, often acidic, liquid before cooking. The origin of the word alludes to the use of brine (aqua marina) in the pickling process, which led to the technique of adding flavor by immersion in liquid. The liquid in question, the 'marinade', can be either acidic (made with ingredients such as vinegar, lemon juice, or wine) or enzymatic (made with ingredients such as pineapple, papaya or kiwifruit).[1] In addition to these ingredients, a marinade often contains oils, herbs, and spices to further flavor the food items.

It is commonly used to flavor foods and to tenderize tougher cuts of meat.[2] The process may last seconds or days. Different marinades are used in different cuisines. For example, in Indian cuisine the marinade is usually prepared with a mixture of spices.

Tissue breakdown

In meats, the acid causes the tissue to break down, which allows more moisture to be absorbed and results in a juicier end product;[2] however, too much acid can be detrimental to the end product. A good marinade has a balance of acid, oil, and spice. If raw marinated meat is frozen, the marinade can break down the surface and turn the outer layer mushy.[3]

Often confused with marinating, macerating is a similar form of food preparation.

Marinating safely

Raw red meat, fish, and chicken may contain harmful bacteria which may contaminate the marinade. Marinating should be done in the refrigerator to inhibit bacterial growth. Used marinade should not be made into a sauce[4] unless rendered safe by boiling directly before use; otherwise, fresh or set-aside marinade that has not touched meat should be used.[5] The container used for marinating should be glass or food safe plastic; metal, including pottery glazes which can contain lead, reacts with the acid in the marinade and should be avoided.[5][6]

See also

Food portal

References

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