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Medical statistics

Medical statistics deals with applications of [2]

Contents

  • Pharmaceutical statistics 1
  • Basic concepts 2
  • Related statistical theory 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • Further reading 6
  • External links 7

Pharmaceutical statistics

Pharmaceutical statistics is the application of statistics to matters concerning the pharmaceutical industry. This can be from issues of design of experiments, to analysis of drug trials, to issues of commercialization of a medicine.

There are many professional bodies concerned with this field including:

There are also journals including:

Basic concepts

For describing situations
For assessing the effectiveness of an intervention

Related statistical theory

  • Survival analysis
  • Proportional hazards models
  • Active control trials: Clinical trials in which a kind of new treatment is compared with some other active agent rather than a placebo.
  • ADLS(Activities of daily living scale): It is a scale designed to measure physical ability/disability that is used in investigations of a variety of chronic disabling conditions, such as arthritis. This scale is based on scoring responses to questions about self-care, grooming, etc.[3]
  • Actuarial statistics: The statistics used by actuaries to calculate liabilities, evaluate risks and plan the financial course of insurance, pensions, etc.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Dodge, Y. (2003) The Oxford Dictionary of Statistical Terms, OUP. ISBN 0-19-850994-4
  2. ^ Kirkwood, Betty R. (2003). essential medical statistics. Blackwell Science, Inc., 350 Main Street, Malden, Massachusetts 02148–5020, USA: Blackwell.  
  3. ^ S, KATZ; FORD A B; MOSKOWITZ R W; JACKSON B A; JAFFE M W (1963). "STUDIES OF ILLNESS IN THE AGED. THE INDEX OF ADL: A STANDARDIZED MEASURE OF BIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL FUNCTION". Journal of the American Medical Association 185: 914.  
  4. ^ Benjamin, Bernard (1993). The analysis of mortality and other actuarial statistics. England, Institute of Actuaries,: Oxford.  

Further reading

  •  
  •  
  • Bland, J. Martin (2000), An Introduction to Medical Statistics (3rd ed.), Oxford: OUP,  
  • Kirkwood, B.R.; Sterne, J.A.C. (2003), Essential Medical Statistics (2nd ed.), Blackwell,  
  • Petrie, Aviva; Sabin, Caroline (2005), Medical Statistics at a Glance (2nd ed.), WileyBlackwell,  
  • Onwude, Joseph (2008), Learn Medical Statistics (2nd ed.), DesignsOnline.co.uk 

External links

  • Health-EU Portal EU health statistics


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