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Men's 110 metres hurdles world record progression

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Title: Men's 110 metres hurdles world record progression  
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Subject: List of world records in athletics, Dayron Robles, Aries Merritt
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Men's 110 metres hurdles world record progression

The following table shows the world record progression in the Men's 110 metres hurdles.

The first world record in the 110 metre hurdles for men (athletics) was recognized by the International Amateur Athletics Federation, now known as the International Association of Athletics Federations, in 1912. The IAAF ratified Forrest Smithson's 15.0 mark set at the 1908 London Olympics as the inaugural record.[1]

To June 21, 2009, the IAAF has ratified 39 world records in the event.[1]

Records 1912–76

Time Wind Auto Athlete Nationality Location of race Date
15.0 Forrest Smithson  United States London 25 July 1908[1]
14.8 Earl Thomson  Canada Antwerp 18 August 1920[1]
14.8 Sten Pettersson  Sweden Stockholm 18 September 1927[1]
14.6 George Weightman-Smith  South Africa Amsterdam 31 July 1928[1]
14.4 Erik Wennestrom  Sweden Stockholm 25 August 1929[1]
14.4 Bengt Sjostedt  Finland Helsinki 5 September 1931[1]
14.4 Percy Beard  United States Cambridge 23 June 1932[1]
14.4 -0.2 14.53 Jack Keller  United States Palo Alto 17 July 1932[1]
14.4 George Saling  United States Los Angeles 2 August 1932[1]
14.4 John Morriss  United States Budapest 12 August 1933[1]
14.4 John Morriss  United States Turin 8 September 1933[1]
14.3 Percy Beard  United States Stockholm 26 July 1934[1]
14.2 Percy Beard  United States Oslo 6 August 1934[1]
14.2 Alvin Moreau  United States Oslo 2 August 1935[1]
14.1w 2.4 Forrest Towns  United States Chicago 19 June 1936[1]
14.1 1.3 Forrest Towns  United States Berlin 6 August 1936[1]
13.7 0.0 Forrest Towns  United States Oslo 27 August 1936[1]
13.7 0.0 Fred Wolcott  United States Philadelphia 29 June 1941[1]
13.6 0.9 Richard Attlesey  United States College Park 24 June 1950[1]
13.5 Richard Attlesey  United States Helsinki 10 July 1950[1]
13.4 0.0 Jack Davis  United States Bakersfield 22 June 1956[1]
13.2 1.9 13.56 Martin Lauer  West Germany Zurich 7 July 1959[1]
13.2 0.0 Lee Calhoun  United States Bern 21 August 1960[1]
13.2 1.8 13.43 Earl McCullouch  United States Minneapolis 16 July 1967[1]
13.2 -0.9 Willie Davenport  United States Zurich 4 July 1969[1]
13.2 0.0 13.24 Rod Milburn  United States Munich 7 September 1972[1]
13.2 1.1 13.41 Rod Milburn  United States Zurich 6 July 1973[1]
13.2 1.5 Rod Milburn  United States Siena 22 July 1973[1]
13.1 1.2 Guy Drut  France Saint Maur 23 July 1975[1]
13.0 1.8 Guy Drut  France West Berlin 22 August 1975[1]

Records 1977–present

From 1975, the IAAF accepted separate automatically electronically timed records for events up to 400 metres. Starting January 1, 1977, the IAAF required fully automatic timing to the hundredth of a second for these events.[1]

Rod Milburn's 1972 Olympic gold medal victory time of 13.24 was the fastest recorded result to that time.

Time Wind Athlete Nationality Location of race Date
13.24 0.0 Rod Milburn  United States Munich 7 September 1972[1]
13.21 0.6 Alejandro Casañas  Cuba Sofia 21 August 1977[1]
13.16 1.7 Renaldo Nehemiah  United States San Jose 14 April 1979[1]
13.00 0.9 Renaldo Nehemiah  United States Westwood 6 May 1979[1]
12.93 -0.2 Renaldo Nehemiah  United States Zurich 19 August 1981[1]
12.92 -0.1 Roger Kingdom  United States Zurich 16 August 1989[1]
12.91 0.5 Colin Jackson  United Kingdom Stuttgart 20 August 1993[1]
12.91 0.3 Liu Xiang  China Athens 27 August 2004[1]
12.88 1.1 Liu Xiang  China Lausanne 11 July 2006[1]
12.87 0.9 Dayron Robles  Cuba Ostrava 12 June 2008[1]
12.80 0.3 Aries Merritt  United States Brussels 7 September 2012[2]

References

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