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Mid-engine, front-wheel-drive layout

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Mid-engine, front-wheel-drive layout

MF layout

In automotive design, a MF, or Mid-engine, Front-wheel-drive layout is one in which the front road wheels are driven by an internal-combustion engine placed just behind them, in front of the passenger compartment. In contrast to the Front-engine, front-wheel-drive layout (FF), the center of mass of the engine is behind the front axle. This layout is typically chosen for its better weight distribution (the heaviest component is near the center of the car, lowering its moment of inertia).

However, the mid-engined layout uses up central space, making the resulting vehicle rather long. This may be why no manufacturer currently offers the MF layout.

Examples of road cars using the MF layout include the Cord 810, BSA Scout, Citroën Traction Avant, Citroën DS, Renault 4 (and derivatives R5 and R6), Renault 16, Saab Sonett mk1, and the Citroën SM, also some commercial vehicles like the Tempo Matador. These vehicles have longitudinal mounted engines; transverse engined vehicles are possible in theory if the issue of passenger footwell location is addressed. The Toyota iQ comes close to this by having its front differential in front of the engine,[1] however despite this, the iQ is still considered to have an FF layout.

Traditionally, the term mid-engine has been reserved for cars that place the engine and Ferrari Testarossa, but an engine placed in front of the driver's compartment but fully behind the front axle line also qualifies as mid-engine.

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References

  1. ^ "TOYOTA IQ: SIX DEGREES OF INNOVATION – NO1". 22 October 2008. Retrieved 5 May 2011. 


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