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Mini sport utility vehicle

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Title: Mini sport utility vehicle  
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Mini sport utility vehicle

In 2013, the Renault Duster became the third best seller subcompact SUV in the world
Peugeot 2008, a modern subcompact SUV
In 2014, the Renault Captur is the best seller subcompact SUV in Europe
Suzuki Samurai, an older model mini SUV
Jeep Wrangler: American made mini SUV
1998 Chevy Tracker, a Canadian-made mini SUV certified as a light truck
Nissan Juke, a modern mini SUV
Opel Mokka, a modern subcompact SUV

Mini SUV (also called subcompact SUV or subcompact crossover) is a class of small sport utility vehicles with a length under and around 4,200 mm (165.4 in). The term usually comprises any vehicle that is smaller than a compact SUV in North-American standardization, or any 4x4 with a supermini body in international standardization or based on a supermini (B-segment cars in Europe) platform.[1][2][3]

First mini SUVs appeared in the course of 1990s and were off-road vehicles built on body-on-frame chassis, such as the Jeep Wrangler and Suzuki Samurai. Although some of the current models still use this concept, mostly due to their off-road prowess and more manageable size on the trail (for example, a large SUV might not fit in the narrower parts of the trail), modern mini SUVs reside on unibody construction and offer only few off-road capabilities, hence falling into the crossover SUV category. Some are even representative of modern superminis with only a bumper hinge and more ground clearance.

In Japan, as cars under 3,400 mm (133.9 in) in length are classified as kei cars and attract lower taxes; some manufacturers build these cars with off-road looks (such as the Mitsubishi Pajero Mini).

Examples

type Brand Name Production Model years
Crossover Chevrolet/Holden Trax 2014 - present
Crossover Citroën C4 Cactus 2014
Crossover Dacia/Renault Duster 2010–present
Crossover Dacia/Renault Sandero Stepway 2008–present
Crossover Daihatsu Terios 1997–present
Crossover Fiat 500X 2014—present
Crossover Ford EcoSport 2003–present
Crossover Honda Crossroad October, 1993-1998
Crossover Honda HR-V 1998–2006
Crossover Honda Vezel Example
Crossover Honda Z 1998-2002 1999–2006
Crossover Jeep Renegade August 2014—present 2015—present
Crossover Lada Niva 1977–present
Crossover Mini Countryman 2010-present
Crossover Mitsubishi Pajero iO/Pinin 1998–2007
Crossover Mitsubishi Pajero Junior 1995 - 1998
Crossover Mitsubishi Pajero Mini 1994–2012
Crossover Mitsubishi Space Runner 1991–2002 2010–present
Crossover Nissan Juke August 26, 2010–present 2011–present[1]
Crossover Opel/Vauxhall,Buick Mokka, Encore
Crossover Peugeot 2008
Crossover Renault/Renault-Samsung Captur/QM3
Crossover Suzuki Ignis
Crossover Suzuki/Fiat SX4/Sedici
Crossover Suzuki Aerio SX
Crossover Toyota Urban Cruiser
Crossover Volkswagen CrossPolo
Crossover Volkswagen CrossFox
Crossover Volkswagen CrossGolf (based on Golf V/VI Plus)
Crossover Zotye 2008/Hunter
Off-roaders AIL Storm
Off-roaders Chevrolet S-10 Blazer ZR-2
Off-roaders Daihatsu Taft
Off-roaders Daihatsu Rocky/Fourtrak
Off-roaders Jeep Wrangler (except long-wheelbase Unlimited)
Off-roaders Lada Niva Example
Off-roaders LuAZ-967 Example
Off-roaders Mazda AZ-Offroad Example
Off-roaders Nissan Terrano Example
Off-roaders Suzuki Samurai/Jimny Example
Off-roaders Suzuki/Geo Vitara/Tracker Example
Off-roaders Toyota Land Cruiser Prado (short-wheel base version) Example
Off-roaders Troller T4 Example
  • Off-roaders Some small SUVs, or off roaders, that are sometimes retrospectively termed Mini MPV:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Prepare for the mini-SUV invasion…". Top Gear. 24 April 2012. Retrieved 29 August 2012. 
  2. ^ "Nissan Juke 1.5dCi Tekna Review". Autocar. Retrieved June 2010. 
  3. ^ "Auto Express - First Drive Nissan Juke". jukeownersclub. Retrieved June 2010. 




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