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Missouri River

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Title: Missouri River  
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Subject: List of capitals in the United States, History of Omaha, Nebraska, List of longest rivers of the United States (by main stem), Kansas City, Missouri, List of longest rivers in the United States by state
Collection: Borders of Iowa, Borders of Kansas, Borders of Missouri, Borders of Nebraska, Borders of South Dakota, Geography of Omaha, Nebraska, Landforms of Broadwater County, Montana, Landforms of Cascade County, Montana, Landforms of Gallatin County, Montana, Landforms of Lewis and Clark County, Montana, Landforms of McCone County, Montana, Landforms of Roosevelt County, Montana, Landforms of Yankton County, South Dakota, Mississippi River Watershed, Missouri River, Rivers of Iowa, Rivers of Kansas, Rivers of Missouri, Rivers of Montana, Rivers of Nebraska, Rivers of North Dakota, Rivers of South Dakota, Tributaries of the Mississippi River, Waterways in Omaha, Nebraska
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Missouri River

tion strategies and alternative ways to manage sediment.[214] The report found that a better understanding of sediment processes in the Missouri River, including the creation of a “sediment budget” – an accounting of sediment transport, erosion, and deposition volumes for the length of the Missouri River – would provide a foundation for projects to improve water quality standards and protect endangered species.[215]

Tourism and recreation

View of a river winding past a sandbar with people on the shore
Part of the Missouri National Recreational River, a 98-mile (158 km) preserved stretch of the Missouri on the border of South Dakota and Nebraska

With over 1,500 sq mi (3,900 km2) of open water, the six reservoirs of the Missouri River Mainstem System provide some of the main recreational areas within the basin. Visitation has increased from 10 million visitor-hours in the mid-1960s to over 60 million visitor-hours in 1990.[197] Development of visitor facilities was spurred by the Federal Water Project Recreation Act of 1965, which required the USACE to build and maintain boat ramps, campgrounds and other public facilities along major reservoirs.[23] Recreational use of Missouri River reservoirs is estimated to contribute $85–100 million to the regional economy each year.[216]

The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, some 3,700 miles (6,000 km) long, follows nearly the entire Missouri River from its mouth to its source, retracing the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Extending from Wood River, Illinois, in the east, to Astoria, Oregon, in the west, it also follows portions of the Mississippi and Columbia Rivers. The trail, which spans through eleven U.S. states, is maintained by various federal and state government agencies; it passes through some 100 historic sites, notably archaeological locations including the Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site.[217][218]

Parts of the river itself are designated for recreational or preservational use. The Missouri National Recreational River consists of portions of the Missouri downstream from Fort Randall and Gavins Point Dams that total 98 miles (158 km).[219][220] These reaches exhibit islands, meanders, sandbars, underwater rocks, riffles, snags, and other once-common features of the lower river that have now disappeared under reservoirs or have been destroyed by channeling. About forty-five steamboat wrecks are scattered along these reaches of the river.[221][222]

Downstream from Great Falls, Montana, about 149 miles (240 km) of the

  • USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center: Missouri River
  • Interactive Maps and Air photos for Missouri River Dams and Reservoirs
  • Missouri River Dams: Canyon Ferry, Hauser and Holter Dams
  • Geographic data related to Missouri River at OpenStreetMap

External links

  • Committee on Missouri River Ecosystem Science, National Research Council (2002). The Missouri River ecosystem: exploring the prospects for recovery. National Academies Press.  
  • Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues, National Research Council (2010). Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. National Academies Press. 
  • Kostyal, K.M.; White, Mel; Walker, Paul Robert; Heacox, Kim (1999). Exploring the Great Rivers of North America. National Geographic Society.  
  • McNeese, Tim (2004). The Missouri River. Infobase Publishing.  

Further reading

  • Athearn, Robert G. (1965). High country empire: the high plains and Rockies. University of Nebraska Press.  
  • Baldridge, W. Scott (2004). Geology of the American Southwest: a journey through two billion years of plate-tectonic history. Cambridge University Press.  
  • Benke, Arthur C.; Cushing, Colbert E. (2005). Rivers of North America. Academic Press.  
  • Cech, Thomas V. (2009). Principles of Water Resources: History, Development, Management, and Policy. John Wiley and Sons.  
  • Christensen, Lawrence O. (1999). Dictionary of Missouri biography. University of Missouri Press.  
  • Demoth, I. MacDonald (1882). The History of Pettis County, Missouri. 
  • Dick, Everett (1971). Tales of the Frontier: From Lewis and Clark to the Last Roundup. University of Nebraska Press.  
  • Edwards, Elwyn Hartley (1987). Horses: their role in the history of man. Willow Books.  
  • Federal Writers' Project. Montana: A State Guide Book. U.S. History Publishers.  
  • Feldhamer, George A.; Thompson, Bruce Carlyle; Chapman, Joseph A. (2003). Wild mammals of North America: biology, management, and conservation. JHU Press.  
  • Greene, Jerome A. (2003). Battles and Skirmishes of the Great Sioux War, 1876–1877: The Military View. University of Oklahoma Press.  
  • Houck, Louis (1908). A history of Missouri from the earliest explorations and settlements until the admission of the state into the union 1. R.R. Donnelley and Sons, Co.  
  • Kellogg, Louis Phelps (1917). Early narratives of the Northwest, 1634–1699 18. C. Scribners's Sons. 
  • King, Philip B. (1971). The Evolution of North America (Revised ed.). Princeton University Press. 
  • Lott, Dale F.; Greene, Harry W. (2003). American Bison: A Natural History. University of California Press.  
  • Mattes, Merrill J. (1987). The Great Platte River Road: The Covered Wagon Mainline Via Fort Kearny to Fort Laramie. University of Nebraska Press.  
  • McFarlan, Donald; McWhirter, Norris (1992). Guinness Book of World Records. Bantam Books.  
  • Morris, Charles, ed. (1912). Twentieth Century Encyclopædia: A Library of Universal Knowledge 5. Syndicate Publishing Co. 
  • Mulvaney, Tom (2008). Helena. Arcadia Publishing.  
  • Roberts, David C.; Hodsdon, W. Grant (2001). A Field Guide to Geology: Eastern North America. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.  
  • Rogers, Jerry R.; Brown, Glenn Owen; Garbrecht, Jürgen (2004). Water Resources and Environmental History. ASCE Publications.  
  • Singer, Siegfried Fred (1970). Global effects of environmental pollution: a symposium organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Springer.  
  • South Dakota State Historical Society, South Dakota Department of History (1902). South Dakota historical collections 1. State Publishing Co. 
  • Sunder, John E. (1993). The Fur Trade on the Upper Missouri, 1840–1865. University of Oklahoma Press.  
  • Thornbury, W. (1965). Regional geomorphology of the United States. John Wiley and Sons.  

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References

  1. ^ The Missouri's flow at Culbertson, Montana, 25 mi (40 km) above the confluence of the two rivers, is about 9,820 cu ft/s (278 m3/s)[15] and the Yellowstone's discharge at Sidney, Montana, roughly the same distance upstream along that river, is about 12,370 cu ft/s (350 m3/s).[16]
  2. ^ The Mississippi River flows for approximately 1,172 miles (1,886 km) above St. Louis,[14] which is just over half of the Missouri's length.
  3. ^ The Mississippi drains an area of 172,200 sq mi (446,000 km2) above the confluence with the Missouri River.[21]
  4. ^ "Long Pool" is the name used by area residents to refer to the smooth, almost lake-like 55 mi (89 km) stretch of the Missouri between the Black Eagle Dam and the town of Cascade. Only about 2 mi (3.2 km) of the so-called Long Pool are actually part of the impoundment behind the dam.

Notes

See also

The Missouri River in Upper Missouri Breaks National Monument, Montana, at the confluence with Cow Creek

Many U.S. national parks, such as Glacier National Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, Yellowstone National Park and Badlands National Park are in the watershed. Parts of other rivers in the basin are set aside for preservation and recreational use – notably the Niobrara National Scenic River, which is a 76-mile (122 km) protected stretch of the Niobrara River, one of the Missouri's longest tributaries.[227] The Missouri flows through or past many National Historic Landmarks, which include Three Forks of the Missouri,[228] Fort Benton, Montana,[229] Big Hidatsa Village Site,[230] Fort Atkinson, Nebraska[231] and Arrow Rock Historic District.[232]

In north-central Montana, some 1,100,000 acres (4,500 km2) along over 125 miles (201 km) of the Missouri River, centering around Fort Peck Lake, comprise the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge.[225] The wildlife refuge consists of a native northern Great Plains ecosystem that has not been heavily affected by human development, except for the construction of Fort Peck Dam. Although there are few designated trails, the whole preserve is open to hiking and camping.[226]

[224][223]

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