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Moderate

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Title: Moderate  
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Subject: Cabinet of Iran, Moderation and Development Party, Assembly of the Forces of Imam's Line, Rightist Socialist Party of Japan, Sean Patrick Maloney
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Moderate

In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who is not extreme, partisan, nor radical.[1] In recent years, the term political moderates has gained traction as a buzzword.

The existence of the ideal moderate is disputed because of a lack of a moderate political ideology.

Aristotle favoured conciliatory politics dominated by the centre rather than the extremes of great wealth and poverty or the special interests of oligarchs and tyrants.[2]

As a political position

Voters who describe themselves as centrist often mean that they are moderate in their political views, advocating neither extreme Gallup polling has shown American voters identifying themselves as moderate between 35–38% of the time over the last 20 years.[3] Voters may identify with moderation for a number of reasons: pragmatic, ideological or otherwise. It has even been suggested that individuals vote for ‘centrist’ parties for purely statistical reasons.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary 
  2. ^ Aristotle, Sir Ernest Barker, R. F. Stalley (1998), Politics, Oxford University Press, p. xxv,  
  3. ^ Saad, Lydia (January 12, 2012). "Conservatives Remain the Largest Ideological Group in U.S.".  
  4. ^ Enelow and Hinich (1984). "Probabilistic Voting and the Importance of Centrist Ideologies in Democratic elections".  
  • Calhoon, Robert McCluer (2008), Ideology and social psychology: extremism, moderation, and contradiction, Cambridge University Press,  
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