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Museum of Mathematics

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Museum of Mathematics

National Museum of Mathematics
(MoMath)
Entrance (2013)
Established November 17, 2009 (2009-11-17) (chartered)
Location 11 East 26th Street
Manhattan, New York City
Coordinates
Director Glen Whitney and Cindy Lawrence
Public transit access

New York City Subway:

Port Authority Trans-Hudson: HOB-33, JSQ-33 (via HOB), or JSQ-33 to 23rd Street

MTA New York City Bus: M1, M2, M3, M5, M7, and M20
Website .orgmomath

The National Museum of Mathematics or MoMath[1] is a museum dedicated to mathematics which opened on December 15, 2012 at 11 East 26th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues, across from Madison Square Park in the NoMad neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City[2][3] It is the only museum dedicated to mathematics in North America,[4] and features over thirty interactive exhibits.[5][6] The mission of the museum is to "enhance public understanding and perception of mathematics."[7]

History

In 2006 the Goudreau Museum on Long Island, at the time the only museum in the United States dedicated to mathematics, closed its doors.[8] In response, a group led by the MoMath's current executive director, Glen Whitney, met to explore the opening of a new museum. They received a charter from the New York State Department of Education in 2009,[7] and raised over 22 million dollars in under four years.[9] With this funding a 19,000 square feet (1,800 m2) space was leased in the Goddard Building at 11-13 East 26th Street, which is part of the Madison Square North Historic District. Despite some opposition to the architectural plans within the local community,[10] permission for construction was granted by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission and the Department of Buildings.

Projects

  • Math Midway is a traveling exhibition of math-based interactive displays. The exhibits include a square-wheeled tricycle that travels smoothly over an undulating mathematical functions and see the results.[11] Since making its debut at the World Science Festival in 2009, Math Midway has traveled the country, reaching almost a half million visitors as of December 2012. Midway's schedule includes stops in New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, California, New Jersey, Ohio, Maryland, Florida, Indiana, and Oregon, and it will continue to travel to museums of science and industry across the continent.
  • Math Midway 2 Go (MM2GO) is a spinoff of Math Midway. MM2GO includes six of the most popular Math Midway Exhibits. MM2GO began traveling to science festivals, schools, community centers, and libraries in the autumn of 2012.[12]
  • Math Encounters is a monthly speaker series presented by the Museum of Math and the Simons Foundation.[13] The lectures initially took place at Baruch College in Manhattan on the first Wednesday of each month, but moved to MoMath's visitor center at 11 East 26th Street in March, 2013 . Every month a different mathematician is invited to deliver a lecture. Lecturers have included Google's Director of Research Peter Norvig, journalist Paul Hoffman, and computer scientist Craig Kaplan. Examples of topics are "The Geometry of Origami", "The Patterns of Juggling", and "Mathematical Morsels from The Simpsons and Futurama".[14] The lectures are meant to be accessible and engaging for high school students and adults. The first lecture occurred on March 3, 2011. Twenty unique lectures had been delivered as of December 5, 2012.[15]
  • Family Fridays began in April 2014 and occurs once a month. MoMath and Time Warner Cable launched the initiative to provide free mathematical opportunities to low-income families in the form of an event series with new activities and presentations each month.[16]

References

  1. ^ Ralph Gardner Jr. (2011-03-09), Making Math Fun (Seriously), Wall Street Journal 
  2. ^ Rocca, Mo (2013-03-04). "A new museum devoted to math".  
  3. ^ Rothstein, Edward (2012-12-13). "Opening the Doors to the Life of Pi".  
  4. ^ Keene, Tom (2013-02-22). "New York's Coolest New Museum, Starring Heidi Klum".  
  5. ^ Colvin, Jill. "new-Math Museum Hopes To Make Numbers Fun For Kids". New York: Dnainfo.com. Retrieved 2009-04-11. 
  6. ^ Kit Dillon. "MoMath No Problems: North America’s Only Math Museum Now Open in Madison Square". New York Observer. Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b "About – The Museum of Mathematics". Momath.org. 2009-11-17. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  8. ^ "Goudreau Museum of Mathematics in Art and Science". The Math Museum. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  9. ^ Chang, Kenneth (2011-06-27). "One Math Museum, Many Variables". New York Times (New York). 
  10. ^ Johnson, Mary (2012-01-26). "Landmarks Commission Gives Thumbs Up to MoMath Facade Plans". New York: Dnainfo.com. 
  11. ^ Andrea Christie Elkin (February 2012), Math Carnival Time, Nctm.org 
  12. ^ "Math Midway 2 Go - Interactive Mathematics Exhibition - Museum of Mathematics". Mathmidway.org. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  13. ^ "Math Encounters: Craig Kaplan on Math and Art « Mr Honner". Mrhonner.com. 2012-01-05. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  14. ^ Eberhart, Jennifer (2012-03-20). "Museum of Mathematics prepares for future home". Examiner (New York). 
  15. ^ "Math Encounters – The Museum of Mathematics". Momath.org. 2013-07-31. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  16. ^ "National Museum of Mathematics and Time Warner Cable Launch Family Fridays Partnership to Provide Engaging Mathematical Programming to Low-Income Families". Virtual-Strategy Magazine. 8 April 2014. Retrieved 3 May 2014. 

External links

  • Official website
  • Museum of Mathematics on Twitter
  • Math Encounters
  • Math Midway
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