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National Association of Counties

 

National Association of Counties

The National Association of Counties (NACo) is an organization that represents county governments in the United States.[1]

The National Association of Counties is the only national organization that represents county governments in the United States. Founded in 1935, NACo provides essential services to the nation’s 3,068 counties. NACo advances issues with a unified voice before the federal government, improves the public's understanding of county government, assists counties in finding and sharing innovative solutions through education and research, and provides value-added services to save counties and taxpayers money.

NACo's membership totals more than 2,350 counties, representing more than 80 percent of the nation's population.

With its headquarters on Capitol Hill, NACo is a full-service organization that provides an extensive line of services including legislative, research, technical and public affairs assistance, as well as enterprise services to its members. The association acts as a liaison with other levels of government, works to improve public understanding of counties, serves as a national advocate for counties and provides them with resources to help them find innovative methods to meet the challenges they face. NACo is involved in a number of special projects that deal with such issues as homeland security, drug abuse and broader access to health care.

NACo understands the importance of strong Washington, D.C. and throughout the country.

NACo's committees, whose members include county officials from every region of the country, are charged on an annual basis with evaluating issues and policies. The policy development process leads to the publication of the American County Platform, which NACo uses as a guide to deliver county government's message to the Administration, Congress and the American public.

Advocacy

NACo strongly supported the [4] According to NACo, the "legislation provides necessary transparency in an effort to stop EAJA abuses," but allows "veterans, social security claimants, individuals, and small businesses" to "still enjoy full access to EAJA funds."[4]

NACo supported the

  • www.naco.org—official site

External links

  1. ^ NACo | Introduction to NACo
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ a b
  5. ^
  6. ^

Notes

[6] NACo placed on their agenda their intention to "urge Congress to pass legislation supporting action to reduce tax crimes and identity theft" such as H.R. 744.[5]

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