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Ninety-fifth United States Congress

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Ninety-fifth United States Congress

95th United States Congress
United States Capitol (2002)

Duration: January 3, 1977 – January 3, 1979

Senate President: Nelson Rockefeller (until Jan 20, 1977)
Walter Mondale (from Jan 20, 1977)
Senate Pres. pro tem: James Eastland
House Speaker: Tip O'Neil
Members: 100 Senators
435 Representatives
5 Non-voting members
Senate Majority: Democratic Party
House Majority: Democratic Party

Sessions
1st: January 4, 1977 – December 15, 1977
2nd: January 19, 1978 – October 15, 1978
<94th 96th>

The Ninety-fifth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1977 to January 3, 1979, during the first two years of the administration of U.S. President Jimmy Carter.

The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Nineteenth Census of the United States in 1970. Both chambers had a Democratic majority. It was the first time either party held a filibuster-proof 60% super majority in both the Senate and House chambers since the 89th United States Congress in 1965, and last time until the 111th United States Congress in 2009. All three super majorities were Democratic party and also were accompanied by Democratic Presidents.[1]

Contents

Major events

Main articles: 1977 and 1978

Hearings

Major legislation

  • August 3, 1977: 445
  • October 12, 1977: 1147
  • December 19, 1977: Unlawful Corporate Payments Act of 1977, 1494
  • December 27, 1977: 1566
  • December 28, 1977: 1626
  • February 25, 1978: Department of Energy Organization Act, 47
  • March 10, 1978: Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act, 120
  • October 10, 1978: Susan B. Anthony Dollar Coin Act of 1979, 1072
  • October 13, 1978: 1111
  • October 13, 1978: Drug Abuse Prevention, Treatment, and Rehabilitation Act, 1268
  • October 24, 1978: 1705
  • October 25, 1978: 1783
  • October 26, 1978: 1824
  • October 27, 1978: 1887
  • October 31, 1978: 2076
  • November 1, 1978: 2383
  • November 6, 1978: 2549
  • November 9, 1978: 3206

Treaties ratified

  • March 16, 1978 — First of the Torrijos-Carter Treaties (Panama Canal) treaty: "The Treaty Concerning the Permanent Neutrality and Operation of the Panama Canal," commonly known as the "Neutrality Treaty"
  • April 19, 1978 — Second of the Torrijos-Carter Treaties treaty, commonly known as "The Panama Canal Treaty"

Party summary

Party
(Shading shows control)
Total Vacant
Conservative
(C)
Democratic
(D)
Independent
(I)
Republican
(R)
End of the previous congress 1 61 1 37 100 0
Begin 0 61 1 38 100 0
End58 41
Final voting share 0.0% 58.0% 1.0% 41.0%
Beginning of the next congress 0 57 1 42 100 0

House of Representatives

TOTAL members: 435

Leadership

Senate

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

House of Representatives

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

Members

Senate

House of Representatives

Template:TOC top

Template:TOC bottom Members of the House of Representatives elected statewide at-large, are preceded by "At-large," and the names of those elected from districts, are preceded by their district numbers.

Many of the congressional district numbers are linked to articles describing the district itself. Since the boundaries of the districts have changed often and substantially, the linked article may only describe the district as it exists today, and not as it was at the time of this Congress.

Changes in Membership

The count below reflects changes from the beginning of the first session of this Congress.

Senate

  • replacements: 11
  • deaths: 4
  • resignations: 5
  • vacancy:
  • Total seats with changes: 9

Template:Ordinal US Congress Senate |- | nowrap | Arkansas
(2) | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | John L. McClellan
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Died November 28, 1977 | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Kaneaster Hodges, Jr.
(D) | December 10, 1977 |- | nowrap | Montana
(2) | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Lee Metcalf
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Died January 12, 1978 | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Paul G. Hatfield
(D) | January 22, 1978 |- | nowrap | Minnesota
(1) | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Hubert Humphrey
(DFL) | style="font-size:80%" | Died January 13, 1978 | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Muriel Humphrey
(D) | January 25, 1978 |- | nowrap | Alabama
(3) | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | James Allen
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Died June 1, 1978 | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Maryon Pittman Allen
(D) | June 8, 1978 |- | nowrap | Alabama
(3) | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Maryon Pittman Allen
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Successor elected November 7, 1978 | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Donald Stewart
(D) | November 7, 1978 |- | nowrap | Minnesota
(1) | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Muriel Humphrey
(DFL) | style="font-size:80%" | Successor elected November 7, 1978 | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | David Durenberger
(R) | November 8, 1978 |- | nowrap | Montana
(2) | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Paul G. Hatfield
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Successor elected and resigned early December 12, 1978 | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Max Baucus
(D) | December 15, 1978 |- | nowrap | Kansas
(2) | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | James B. Pearson
(R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 23, 1978 | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Nancy Kassebaum
(R) | December 23, 1978 |- | nowrap | Mississippi
(2) | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | James Eastland
(D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 27, 1978 | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Thad Cochran
(R) | December 27, 1978 |- | nowrap | Minnesota
(2) | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Wendell Anderson
(DFL) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 29, 1978 | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Rudy Boschwitz
(R) | December 30, 1978 |- | nowrap | Wyoming
(2) | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Clifford Hansen
(R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 31, 1978 | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Alan K. Simpson
(R) | January 1, 1979 |- | nowrap | Virginia
(2) | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | William L. Scott
(R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned January 1, 1979 | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | John Warner
(R) | January 2, 1979 |}

House of Representatives

  • replacements: 6
  • deaths: 6
  • resignations: 21
  • contested election:
  • Total seats with changes: 25


Template:Ordinal US Congress Rep |- | Minnesota 7th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Robert Bergland (DFL) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned January 22, 1977 after being appointed United States Secretary of Agriculture | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Arlan Stangeland (R) | February 22, 1977 |- | Washington 7th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Brock Adams (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned January 22, 1977 after being appointed United States Secretary of Transportation | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | John E. Cunningham (R) | May 17, 1977 |- | Georgia 5th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Andrew Young (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned January 29, 1977 after being appointed United States Ambassador to the United Nations | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Wyche Fowler (D) | April 6, 1977 |- | Louisiana 1st | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Richard A. Tonry (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Forced to resign May 4, 1977 | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Bob Livingston (R) | August 27, 1977 |- | New York 18th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Ed Koch (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned January 31, 1977 after being elected Mayor of New York City | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | S. William Green (R) | February 14, 1978 |- | New York 21st | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Herman Badillo (D-L) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned January 31, 1977 after becoming Deputy Mayor of New York City | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Robert García (R-L) | February 14, 1978 |- | New York 21st | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Robert García (R-L) | style="font-size:80%" | Changed parties February 21, 1978 | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Robert García (D) | February 21, 1978 |- | Tennessee 5th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Clifford Allen (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Died June 18, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | California 18th | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | William M. Ketchum (R) | style="font-size:80%" | Died June 24, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | Illinois 1st | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Ralph Metcalfe (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Died October 10, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | Maryland 6th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Goodloe Byron (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Died October 11, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | California 11th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Leo Ryan (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Murdered by members of the Peoples Temple at the Guyana Airport November 18, 1978 shortly before the Jonestown Massacre | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | Wisconsin 6th | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | William A. Steiger (R) | style="font-size:80%" | Died December 4, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | Montana 1st | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Max Baucus (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 14, 1978 after being appointed to the US Senate | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | Mississippi 4th | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Thad Cochran (R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 26, 1978 after being appointed to the US Senate | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | Wyoming At-large | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Teno Roncalio (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 30, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | California 3rd | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | John E. Moss (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 31, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | California 14th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | John J. McFall (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 31, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | California 33rd | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Del M. Clawson (R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 31, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | Kansas 5th | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Joe Skubitz (R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 31, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | Michigan 10th | style="background:#FFB6B6" nowrap | Elford A. Cederberg (R) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 31, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | New Jersey 14th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Joseph A. LeFante (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 31, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | New York 9th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | James Delaney (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 31, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | Texas 6th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Olin E. Teague (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 31, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | Texas 11th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | William R. Poage (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 31, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |- | Texas 17th | style="background:#B0CEFF" nowrap | Omar Burleson (D) | style="font-size:80%" | Resigned December 31, 1978 | Vacant | Not filled this term |}

Employees

Senate

House of Representatives

References

External links

  • Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress
  • U.S. House of Representatives: Congressional History
  • U.S. Senate: Statistics and Lists
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