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Nordavia

Nordavia
Нордавиа
IATA ICAO Callsign
5N AUL ARCHANGELSK AIR
Founded
  • 1963 (as Arkhangelsk United Aviation Squadron)
  • 1991 (as AVL Arkhangelsk Airlines)
  • 2004 (as Aeroflot-Nord)
  • 2009 (as Nordavia)
Operating bases
Focus cities Pulkovo Airport
Fleet size 9
Destinations 21
Parent company Norilsk Nickel
Headquarters Talagi Airport
Arkhangelsk, Russia
Key people Vladimir Antonov (Chairman)[1]
Website Nordavia.ru/eng/

Nordavia (Russian: Нордавиа), formerly known as Aeroflot-Nord (Аэрофлот-Норд), is an airline with its head office on the grounds of Talagi Airport in Arkhangelsk, Russia.[2] It operates mainly scheduled domestic and regional services. Its main bases are Talagi Airport and Moscow Sheremetyevo Airport.[3] Nordavia is a joint-stock company.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Destinations 2
    • Codeshare agreements 2.1
  • Fleet 3
  • Accidents and incidents 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

History

An Aeroflot-Nord Boeing 737-500.

The airline was formed in 1963 as Arkhangelsk United Aviation Squadron (Russian: Архангельский объединенный авиационный отряд) and became AVL Arkhangelsk Airlines (Архангельские воздушные линии) in 1991. In August 2004 Aeroflot acquired 51% of the airline, with the rest being held by Aviainvest. The company was renamed Aeroflot-Nord, becoming Aeroflot's second regional airline.[4] It joined the European Regions Airline Association in December 2006.

Since the contract with Aeroflot ended on 1 December 2009, the airline has operated independently as Nordavia.[5] Because of the bad press the subsidiary received following the Aeroflot Flight 821 disaster, and Russian aviation officials' 15 July 2009 imposition of restrictions (including a ban on international charter tours) on then Aeroflot-Nord flight operations due to insufficient security and bad finances, Aeroflot has distanced itself from Nordavia.[6]

In March 2011, Aeroflot sold the airline to Norilsk Nickel for a reported US$7 million. Kommersant has quoted experts who believe that Norilsk Nickel may merge Nordavia with Taimyr Air Company, which is already owned by the company.[7] On December 1, 2011 Norilsk Nickel reported that Nordavia is to be merged in Taimyr Air Company.[8]

An Aeroflot-Nord Antonov-24RV.
An Aeroflot-Nord Tupolev Tu-134A.

Destinations

Codeshare agreements

Nordavia Airlines also has codeshare agreements with the following airlines:

Fleet

The Nordavia fleet consists of the following aircraft (as of May 2014):[10]

Accidents and incidents

  • On 14 September 2008, Aeroflot Flight 821, flown under a combined service agreement with Aeroflot,[12] crashed on approach to Perm Airport, Russia. All 88 passengers; including 6 crew members were killed.[13]
former logo of Aeroflot-Nord

References

  1. ^ Nordavia Chairman
  2. ^ "Contact Us." Nordavia. Retrieved on 29 June 2010. "Legal address: Russian Federation, 163053, Arkhangelsk, Talagi Airport." – "Контакты." Address in Russian: "163053, г. Архангельск, Аэропорт "Архангельск"."
  3. ^ "Directory: World Airlines".  
  4. ^ Flight International 27 March 2007
  5. ^ "ERA Welcomes Aeroflot-Nord". European Regions Airline Association (ERA). 2006-12-18. Retrieved 2008-09-14. 
  6. ^ "Aeroflot-Nord in trouble". BarentsObserver. 2009-07-17. Retrieved 2009-08-05. 
  7. ^ "Russia's Aeroflot airline sells Nordavia for $7 mln — paper".  
  8. ^ "Aviaport digest, Dec. 1st, 2011" (in Русский). Aviaport.ru. 2011-01-12. Retrieved 2013-02-04. 
  9. ^ L, J (6 April 2015). "Nordavia Expands Moscow Domodedovo Service in S15; New Codeshare Partnership with S7 Airlines". Airline Route. Retrieved 6 April 2015. 
  10. ^ a b "Nordavia fleet list at ch-aviation.ch". Ch-aviation.ch. Retrieved 2013-02-04. 
  11. ^ Nordavia official fleet page, Retrieved 2011-11-01.
  12. ^ "September 14, 2008." Aeroflot. Accessed September 14, 2008.
  13. ^ "Aeroflot-Nord Flight 821 down near Perm". Russiatoday.com. 15 September 2008. Retrieved 2013-02-04. 

External links

  • (English) (Russian) Official website
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