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Ocoee, Florida

Ocoee
City
Ocoee, Florida
The Withers-Maguire House
Motto: "The Center of Good Living"
Location in Orange County and the state of Florida
Location in Orange County and the state of Florida
Coordinates:
Country  United States
State  Florida
County  Orange
Government
 • Mayor John W. Grogan (R)
Area
 • Total 15.7 sq mi (40.6 km2)
 • Land 14.7 sq mi (38.1 km2)
 • Water 1.0 sq mi (2.5 km2)
Elevation 121 ft (37 m)
Population (2010)[1]
 • Total 35,579
 • Estimate (2013)[2] 39,172
 • Density 2,300/sq mi (880/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 34761
Area code(s) 407
FIPS code 12-51075[3]
GNIS feature ID 0288049[4]
Website City of Ocoee

Ocoee is a city in Orange County, Florida, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 35,579.[5] It is part of the Orlando–Kissimmee–Sanford, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Founding 1.1
    • Ocoee massacre 1.2
  • Geography 2
  • Demographics 3
  • Transportation 4
  • Notable people 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • Notes 8
  • External links 9

History

Founding

In the mid-1850s, Dr. J.D. Starke, stricken with malaria, led a group of slaves, similarly stricken, to the north side of an open pine wooded lake that provided clear and clean water to avoid further malaria outbreaks. The camp built by the group provided a base of operations from which to commute during the day to work the fields near Lake Apopka and rest at night. As the camp grew into a village, it took the name Starke Lake, a name the lake upon which the group settled bears to this day. The city's population increased further after the American Civil War as confederate soldiers and their families settled into the area, including Captain Bluford Sims and General William Temple Withers who wintered at the location.[6] Captain Sims received a land grant for a 74-acre parcel to the west of Starke Lake in what is now the downtown portion of Ocoee on October 5, 1883.[7] In 1886, Captain Sims, along with a group of original settlers, led an effort to have the town platted and changed the name to Ocoee, after a river near he grew up in Tennessee.[7]

Ocoee massacre

On November 2, 1920, after two black men (July Perry and Moses Norman) attempted to vote and encouraged other blacks to vote, the entire black population of the town was violently attacked. On the night of the massacre, white World War I veterans from throughout Orange County participated. At least 24 black homes were burned, the institutions constituting the black community were destroyed and Perry was lynched. Before the massacre, Ocoee's black population numbered approximately five hundred; after the massacre, however, the black population was virtually eliminated. For more than 40 years, Ocoee remained an all-white town.[8][9]

Geography

Ocoee is located at .[10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 15.7 square miles (40.6 km2), of which 14.7 square miles (38.1 km2) is land and 0.97 square miles (2.5 km2) (6.12%) is water.[11]

Demographics

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 24,391 people, 8,072 households, and 6,554 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,843.1 inhabitants per square mile (711.8/km²). There were 8,405 housing units at an average density of 635.1 per square mile (245.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 81.47% White, 6.59% African American, 0.35% Native American, 2.93% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 6.22% from other races, and 2.38% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 15.20% of the population.

There were 8,072 households out of which 44.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.9% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.8% were non-families. 13.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.99 and the average family size was 3.28.

In the city the population was spread out with 29.2% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 36.2% from 25 to 44, 19.3% from 45 to 64, and 7.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 97.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $53,225, and the median income for a family was $56,865. Males had a median income of $33,628 versus $26,519 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,896. About 4.2% of families and 5.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.6% of those under age 18 and 8.1% of those age 65 or over.

As of the 2005-2009 American Community Survey the population was 31,544, and the city had a racial makeup of 74.9% White, 13.8% African American, 4.0% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 5.4% some other race and 1.6% two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race was 16.6%.

Transportation

Ocoee was served by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. The Ocoee station burned in a fire of undetermined origin, Tuesday 4 December 1928.[18]

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ "American FactFinder".  
  2. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  5. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Ocoee city, Florida". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved September 20, 2012. 
  6. ^ Maguire, Nancy (1998-09-17). "Ocoee House Is Gateway To Past". Orlando Sentinel (Orlando: Tribune). Retrieved 2014-03-24. 
  7. ^ a b Fyotek, Cassandra (2009). Historic Orange County:The Story of Orlando and Orange County. Historical Publishing Network. p. 144.  
  8. ^ http://www.orlandoweekly.com/news/story.asp?id=897 Orlando Weekly 10/1/1998
  9. ^ http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/Fall01/white/default.html Go Ahead On, Ocoee - A Narrative Documentary Film by Bianca White & Sandra Krasa
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  11. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Ocoee city, Florida". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved September 20, 2012. 
  12. ^ ThreadEx
  13. ^ "NowData – NOAA Online Weather Data".  
  14. ^ "Station Name: FL ORLANDO INTL AP". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2014-05-13. 
  15. ^ "WMO Climate Normals for ORLANDO/JETPORT, FL 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2014-05-13. 
  16. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  17. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  18. ^ Associated Press, "Station burns down", Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Sarasota, Florida, Wednesday 5 December 1928, Volume 4, Number 51, page one.

Notes

  1. ^ Orlando Int'l became the official station of record for Orlando in February 1974.[12]

External links

  • City of Ocoee official website
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