World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Order of precedence in England and Wales

Article Id: WHEBN0000367634
Reproduction Date:

Title: Order of precedence in England and Wales  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: England and Wales, Orders of precedence in the United Kingdom, Orders of precedence, Alun Gwynne Jones, Baron Chalfont, Thomas Dunne (Lord Lieutenant)
Collection: England and Wales, Orders of Precedence
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Order of precedence in England and Wales

The following is the order of precedence in England and Wales as of May 2015. Separate orders exist for gentlemen and ladies.

Names in italics indicate that these people rank elsewhere—either higher in that table of precedence or in the table for the other sex. Titles in italics indicate the same thing for their holders, or that they are vacant.

Peers and their families make up a large part of these tables. It is possible for a peer to hold more than one title of nobility, and these may belong to different ranks and peerages. A peer derives his precedence from his highest-ranking title; peeresses derive their precedence in their same way, whether they hold their highest-ranking title in their own right or by marriage. The ranks in the tables refer to peers rather than titles: if exceptions are named for a rank, these do not include peers of a higher rank (or any peers at all, in the case of baronets). No exceptions are named for most categories, due to their large size.

Contents

  • Gentlemen 1
    • Royalty, archbishops, et al. 1.1
      • Royal Family 1.1.1
      • Archbishops, High Officers of State, et al. 1.1.2
    • Nobility, bishops, et al. 1.2
      • Dukes, et al. 1.2.1
      • Marquesses, et al. 1.2.2
      • Earls, et al. 1.2.3
      • Viscounts, et al. 1.2.4
      • Bishops 1.2.5
      • Barons 1.2.6
    • Gentry, et al. 1.3
      • Master of the Rolls and Supreme Court Justices 1.3.1
      • Royal Household officials 1.3.2
      • Cabinet, et al. 1.3.3
      • Knights of the Garter and Knights of the Thistle 1.3.4
      • Privy Counsellors, et al. 1.3.5
      • Senior judges, et al. 1.3.6
      • Baronets 1.3.7
      • Knights 1.3.8
      • Lower level judges, et al. 1.3.9
    • Other lower ranks, including Esquires and Gentlemen 1.4
      • Companions, commanders, lieutenants and officers of various orders 1.4.1
      • Eldest sons of various grades 1.4.2
      • Members of orders 1.4.3
      • Younger sons of various grades 1.4.4
  • Ladies 2
    • Royalty 2.1
    • High Officers of State, et al. 2.2
    • Nobility, et al. 2.3
    • Gentry, et al. 2.4
    • Other lower ranks 2.5
    • Ladies and Dames, et al. 2.6
    • Members of orders, et al. 2.7
    • Wives and daughters of peers, baronets, and knights, et al. 2.8
    • Wives of younger sons 2.9
  • Local precedence 3
  • Notes 4
  • References 5

Gentlemen

Royalty, archbishops, et al.

Royal Family

Precedence is accorded to spouses, children and grandchildren of the reigning sovereign, as well as children and grandchildren of former sovereigns. *There is no specific place in the order for a great-grandchild of the Sovereign (no matter how senior in the

  1. ^ a b  
  2. ^ The London Gazette: no. 39657. p. 5147. 30 September 1952.
  3. ^ a b c d "Order of Precedence in England and Wales". Heraldica. 2001. Retrieved 6 June 2013. 
  4. ^ "The College of Arms Newsletter, No. 11".  
  5. ^ The London Gazette: no. 58050. p. 9986. 21 July 2006.
  6. ^ a b c d e The London Gazette: no. 59201. p. 16957. 1 October 2009.
  7. ^ a b The London Gazette: no. 58529. p. 17439. 30 November 2007.
  8. ^ The London Gazette: no. 28019. pp. 3080–3081. 7 May 1907.
  9. ^ "James Alexander Douglas-Hamilton (Lord Selkirk of Douglas)".  
  10. ^ "Lords – Lord Selkirk of Douglas". UK Parliament. Retrieved 25 October 2012. 
  11. ^ "Press Notice – Courtesy titles for Justices of the Supreme Court" (PDF).  
  12. ^ The London Gazette: no. 59746. pp. 6177–6178. 1 April 2011.
  13. ^ Cabinet Office (2011). The Cabinet Manual (PDF). p. 35. Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
  14. ^ "Ministers". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 11 May 2015. 
  15. ^ The London Gazette: no. 57794. p. 13701. 24 October 2005.
  16. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 41454. pp. 4641–4642. 22 July 1958.
  17. ^ "General information".  
  18. ^ "Precedence Amongst Ladies in England and Wales". Debrett's. n.d. Retrieved 3 March 2015. 

References

  1. ^ The Duke of Edinburgh was accorded precedence immediately after his wife's "except where otherwise provided by Act of Parliament" by Royal Warrant dated 18 September 1952.[2]
  2. ^ a b The speakership of the House of Lords was historically vested in the Lord Chancellor; following the creation of a separate office of Lord Speaker, its rank and precedence was established by Royal Warrant dated 4 July 2006 as being immediately after that of the Speaker of the House of Commons.[4][5]
  3. ^ When visiting the United Kingdom, cabinet ministers of foreign countries are given precedence immediately above that of their country's High Commissioner (if in the Commonwealth) or Ambassador (if not).
  4. ^ a b If the Lord Steward of the Household and the Lord Chamberlain are dukes, they rank between the Great Officers of State and the remaining dukes; if not, they are placed at the head of their rank.
  5. ^ If the Master of the Horse holds a rank lower than a duke in the peerage, then by Royal Warrant dated 6 May 1907, he ranks next after the Lord Chamberlain.[8]
  6. ^ Lord James Douglas-Hamilton, second son of the 14th Duke of Hamilton, inherited the earldom of Selkirk from his uncle in 1994 and disclaimed it to retain his seat in the House of Commons. He now ranks as a life peer, having accepted the barony of Selkirk of Douglas in 1997.[9][10]
  7. ^ Barons and baronesses for life created under the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876 and the Life Peerages Act 1958.
  8. ^ Lord Chalfont is the only life peer who outranks hereditary barons (four) in seniority of creation.
  9. ^ a b Justices of the Supreme Court who are not peers have the right to the courtesy title of "Lord" or "Lady" for life by authority of Royal Warrant issued 10 December 2010.[11][12]
  10. ^ The Prime Minister determines the order of precedence for Secretaries of State. If he is absent from a Cabinet meeting, the chair is assumed by the highest-ranking Secretary of State present; the same rule is followed in Cabinet committees when both their chair and deputy chair are absent.[13] The current order of precedence can be found in the website of the Prime Minister's Office.[14]
  11. ^ The last Knight, Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, died in 1974.
  12. ^ Privy Counsellors who do not already rank higher are mostly current or former politicians, civil servants, royal household staff, clergy and judiciary.
  13. ^ This office was historically held jointly with that of Lord Chief Justice; following their separation, a Royal Warrant dated 30 September 2005 declared "that the rank and precedence of the President of the Queen's Bench Division shall be so placed as to be in order immediately before the President of the Family Division".[15]
  14. ^ Rank and precedence set by Royal Warrant, dated 21 July 1958.[16]
  15. ^ Baronetcies belong to either of five baronetages, namely the Baronetages of England (1611–1705), Nova Scotia (1625–1706), Ireland (1620–1799), Great Britain (1707–1800) and the United Kingdom (1801–present); this does not affect their precedence in relation to each other.
  16. ^ a b The last Knight Grand Commander, the Maharaja of Travancore, died in 1991.
  17. ^ The last Knight Commander, the Maharaja of Alwar, died in 2009.
  18. ^ The last Knight Commander, the Maharaja of Dhrangadhra-Halvad, died in 2010.
  19. ^ In formal documents the word Knight or the abbreviation Kt. may be added. This style is often adopted by Knights Bachelor who are also peers, baronets or knights of the various statutory orders.[17]
  20. ^ The last Companion, Ronald Brockman, died in 1999.
  21. ^ The last Companion, Hugh Edward Richardson, died in 2000.

Notes

  • The Lord Lieutenant of the County
  • The High Sheriff of the County
  • The Lord Mayor
  • The (elected) mayor
  • The chairman of the county council
  • The deputy mayor
  • Aldermen
  • Councillors
  • Justices of the Peace
  • The clerk of the County Council
  • The town clerk
  • The chief constable
  • The county engineer or borough engineer

Local precedence

  • Wives of younger sons of baronets
  • Wives of younger sons of knights
    • Wives of younger sons of Knights of the Garter
    • Wives of younger sons of Knights of the Thistle
    • Wives of younger sons of Knights of St Patrick
    • Wives of younger sons of Knights Grand Cross or Knights Grand Commander
    • Wives of younger sons of Knights Commander

Wives of younger sons

  • Wives of the eldest sons of sons of peers or peeresses
  • Daughters of sons of peers or peeresses
  • Wives of the eldest sons of baronets
  • Daughters of baronets
  • Wives of eldest sons of knights
    • Wives of eldest sons of Knights of the Garter
    • Wives of eldest sons of Knights of the Thistle
    • Wives of eldest sons of Knights of St Patrick
    • Wives of eldest sons of Knights Grand Cross or Grand Commander
    • Wives of eldest sons of Knights Commander
  • Daughters of knights:
    • Daughters of Knights of the Garter
    • Daughters of Knights of the Thistle
    • Daughters of Knights Grand Cross or Grand Commander
    • Daughters of Knights Commander
  • Members of the Royal Victorian Order
  • Members of the Order of the British Empire
  • Wives of members of the Royal Victorian Order
  • Wives of members of the Order of the British Empire

Wives and daughters of peers, baronets, and knights, et al.

  • Companions of orders
    • Companions of the Order of the Bath
    • Companions of the Order of St Michael and St George
    • Commanders of the Royal Victorian Order
    • Commanders of the Order of the British Empire
  • Wives of members of orders
    • Wives of Companions of the Order of the Bath
    • Wives of Companions of the Order of the Star of India
    • Wives of Companions of the Order of St Michael and St George
    • Wives of Companions of the Order of the Indian Empire
    • Wives of Commanders of the Royal Victorian Order
    • Wives of Commanders of the Order of the British Empire
    • Wives of Companions of the Distinguished Service Order
  • Lieutenants of the Royal Victorian Order
  • Officers of the Order of the British Empire
  • Wives of Lieutenants of the Royal Victorian Order
  • Wives of Officers of the Order of the British Empire
  • Companions of the Imperial Service Order
  • Wives of Companions of the Imperial Service Order

Members of orders, et al.

  • Ladies of the Garter (all already rank higher in precedence)
  • Ladies of the Thistle (who are not already ranked higher)
  • Wives of Knights of the Garter (who are not already ranked higher)
  • Wives of Knights of the Thistle (who are not already ranked higher)
    • Lady Anderson
    • Lady Morrison
  • Privy counsellors
  • Senior judges
  • Wives of viscounts' younger sons
  • Wives of younger sons of barons or baronesses
  • Baronetesses in their own right (none, as Dame Anne Maxwell MacDonald, Baronetess of Stirling-Maxwell of Pollock a Baronetess in her own right died on 21 April 2011)
  • Wives of baronets
  • Dames Grand Cross
  • Wives of Knights Grand Cross and Grand Commander
    • Wives of Knights Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath
    • Wives of Knights Grand Commander of the Order of the Star of India
    • Wives of Knights Grand Cross of the Order of St Michael and St George
    • Wives of Knights Grand Commander of the Order of the Indian Empire
    • Wives of Knights Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order
    • Wives of Knights Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire
  • Dames Commander
    • Dames Commander of the Order of the Bath
    • Dames Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George
    • Dames Commander of the Royal Victorian Order
    • Dames Commander of the Order of the British Empire
  • Circuit judges
  • Wives of Knights Commander
  • Wives of Knights Bachelor

Ladies and Dames, et al.

  • Wives of viscounts' eldest sons
  • Viscounts' daughters not married to peers
  • Wives of younger sons of earls or of countesses in their own right
  • Wives of eldest sons of barons or baronesses
  • Daughters of barons or baronesses not married to peers

Other lower ranks

Gentry, et al.

Nobility, et al.

High Officers of State, et al.

The order of precedence accorded to ladies of the royal family differs depending on whether or not they are accompanied by a husband who is accorded higher precedence. When unaccompanied, blood relations of the sovereign are always accorded higher precedence. For example, when not accompanied by The Prince of Wales, the Duchess of Cornwall ranks after Princess Alexandra; when with her husband, the Duchess of Cornwall ranks above all ladies other than the reigning sovereign and any queens dowager.[18] *There is no specific place in the order for a great-grandchild of the Sovereign (no matter how senior in the order of succession), however Princess Charlotte of Cambridge is entitled to precedence as the daughter of a Duke of the Blood Royal, pursuant to the unrevoked Lord Chamberlain's Order of 1520 as amended in 1595.[1]

Royalty

Ladies

  • Younger sons of baronets (ordered according to the precedence of the baronets)
  • Younger sons of knights (ordered according to the precedence of the knights)

Younger sons of various grades

Members of orders

  • Eldest sons of younger sons of hereditary peers or hereditary peeresses in their own right (ordered according to the precedence of the peerage holders)
  • Eldest sons of baronets (ordered according to the precedence of the baronets)
  • Eldest sons of knights (ordered according to the precedence of the knights)

Eldest sons of various grades

Companions, commanders, lieutenants and officers of various orders

Other lower ranks, including Esquires and Gentlemen

Lower level judges, et al.

Knights

  • Baronets (Bt) (ordered according to date of creation),[nb 15] excepting:
    • Sir William Gladstone, who ranks higher as a Knight of the Garter; and
    • Sir George Young, who ranks higher as a Privy Counsellor

Baronets

Senior judges, et al.

Privy Counsellors, et al.

Knights of the Garter and Knights of the Thistle

Cabinet, et al.

Royal Household officials

Master of the Rolls and Supreme Court Justices

Gentry, et al.

Barons

Bishops

Viscounts, et al.

Earls, et al.

Marquesses, et al.

Dukes, et al.

Nobility, bishops, et al.

Archbishops, High Officers of State, et al.

[1]

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.