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Oxamyl

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Title: Oxamyl  
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Collection: Carbamate Insecticides, Nematicides
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Oxamyl

Oxamyl
Identifiers
CAS number  YesY
PubChem
ChemSpider
ChEMBL
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C7H13N3O3S
Molar mass 219.26 g mol−1
Appearance Colorless crystalline solid[1]
Density 0.97 g/cm3[1]
Melting point 100 to 102 °C (212 to 216 °F; 373 to 375 K)
108 to 110 °C (dimorphic)[1]
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)

Oxamyl is a chemical used as a pesticide that comes in two forms: granulated and liquid. The granulated form has been banned in the United States.[2]

Structure and uses

Oxamyl is a [1]

According to the [1]

Because of its toxicity, its use is restricted in the EU/UK with maximum residue limits for apples and oranges being 0.01 mg/kg and this amount is only allowed because this is the limit of detection.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "DATA SHEETS ON PESTICIDES No. 54 - 1983 - OXAMYL". WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION. 1983. Retrieved 30 January 2012. 
  2. ^ a b United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme. Division of Technology, Industry, and Economics. Economics and Trade Unit, United Nations Development Programme, Envirotech Ltd (2005). Effects of trade liberalization on agriculture in Lebanon: with special focus on products where methyl bromide is used. UNEP/Earthprint. p. 22. 
  3. ^ a b "Oxamyl". PAN Pesticides Database - Chemicals. Retrieved 30 January 2012. 
  4. ^ "OXAMYL". Extension Toxicology Network. 1993. Retrieved 30 January 2012. 

External Links

  • Pesticide Properties Database (PPDB) record for Oxamyl
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