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Pheniramine

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Title: Pheniramine  
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Subject: Triprolidine, Mepyramine, Meclizine, Phenyltoloxamine, Esmirtazapine
Collection: Amines, H1 Receptor Antagonists, Pyridines
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Pheniramine

Pheniramine
Systematic (IUPAC) name
N,N-dimethyl-3-phenyl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propan-1-amine
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com
MedlinePlus
Pregnancy
category
  • AU: A
  • US: C (Risk not ruled out)
Routes of
administration
Oral ; injection (intramuscular or slow intravenous); topical (ophthalmic/nasal solution)
Pharmacokinetic data
Metabolism Hepatic hydroxylation, demethylation and glucuronidation
Excretion Renal
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number  YesY
ATC code D04 R06
PubChem CID:
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank  YesY
ChemSpider  YesY
UNII  YesY
KEGG  YesY
ChEMBL  YesY
Chemical data
Formula C16H20N2
Molecular mass 240.343 g/mol
 YesY   

Pheniramine (INN, trade name Avil, among others) is an antihistamine with anticholinergic properties used to treat allergic conditions such as hay fever or urticaria. It has relatively strong sedative effects, and may sometimes be used off-label as an over-the-counter sleeping pill in a similar manner to other sedating antihistamines such as diphenhydramine. Pheniramine is also commonly found in eyedrops used for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis.

Pheniramine is generally sold in combination with other medications, rather than as a stand-alone drug, although some formulations are available containing pheniramine by itself. As an example, Neo Citran contains pheniramine.

Contents

  • Chemical relatives 1
  • Side effects 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Chemical relatives

Derivatives of pheniramine include chlorphenamine, dexchlorpheniramine, dexbrompheniramine, deschlorpheniramine, triprolidine, and brompheniramine. Two other halogenated derivatives, iodopheniramine and fluorpheniramine, are currently in use for research on combination therapies for malaria and some cancers. The halogenation of pheniramine increases its potency by 20-fold.

Side effects

Pheniramine may cause drowsiness or bradycardia, and over-dosage may lead to sleep disorders. Overdose may lead to seizures, especially in combination with alcohol. People combining with cortisol in the long term should avoid pheniramine as it may cause lowered levels of adrenaline (epinephrine) which may lead to loss of consciousness.

See also

References

External links


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