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Plesiomonas shigelloides

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Title: Plesiomonas shigelloides  
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Subject: Enterobacteriaceae, Enterobacteria, Foodborne illness, Rickettsia africae, Rickettsia honei
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Plesiomonas shigelloides

Plesiomonas shigelloides
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Bacteria
Phylum: Proteobacteria
Class: Gammaproteobacteria
Order: Enterobacteriales
Family: Enterobacteriaceae
Genus: Plesiomonas
corrig. Habs and Schubert 1962
Species: P. shigelloides
Binomial name
Plesiomonas shigelloides
corrig. (Bader 1954)
Habs and Schubert 1962
Synonyms

Pseudomonas shigelloides Bader 1954
Aeromonas shigelloides (Bader 1954) Ewing et al. 1961
Fergusonia shigelloides (Bader 1954) Sebald and Véron 1963

Plesiomonas shigelloides is a species of bacteria.[1] It is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium which has been isolated from freshwater, freshwater fish, and shellfish and from many types of animals including cattle, goats, swine, cats, dogs, monkeys, vultures, snakes, and toads.

Infections from this organism cause gastroenteritis, followed by septicemia in immune deficient patients. It is placed among the Enterobacteriaceae. Some Plesiomonas strains share antigens with Shigella sonnei, and cross-reactions with Shigella antisera occur. Plesiomonas can be distinguished from Shigella in diarrheal stools by an oxidase test: Plesiomonas is oxidase positive and Shigella is oxidase negative. Plesiomonas is negative for DNAse; this and other biochemical tests distinguish it from Aeromonas sp.

References

  1. ^ Niedziela T, Lukasiewicz J, Jachymek W, Dzieciatkowska M, Lugowski C, Kenne L (April 2002). "Core oligosaccharides of Plesiomonas shigelloides O54:H2 (strain CNCTC 113/92): structural and serological analysis of the lipopolysaccharide core region, the O-antigen biological repeating unit, and the linkage between them". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (14): 11653–63.  

medical microbiology by Jawetz,Melnick & Adelberg


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