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President of Princeton University

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Title: President of Princeton University  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Woodrow Wilson, Ashbel Green, Shirley M. Tilghman, Harold W. Dodds, Princeton University
Collection: Presidents of Princeton University, Princeton University
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President of Princeton University

Princeton University is led by a President selected by the Board of Trustees. Until the accession of Woodrow Wilson, a political scientist, in 1902, they were all Presbyterian clergymen, as well as professors.[1] Former President Shirley M. Tilghman is a biologist; her two predecessors were economists. The official residence of the president of the university is the Walter Lowrie House.[2] Prior to 1968, Prospect House served in that capacity.[3]

Presidents

Acting Presidents are in italics
  1. Reverend Jonathan Dickinson 1747[4]
    Aaron Burr, Sr. 1747-1748
  2. Reverend Aaron Burr, Sr. 1748-1757
  3. Reverend Jonathan Edwards 1758
    Jacob Green 1758-1759
  4. Reverend Samuel Davies 1759-1761
  5. Reverend Samuel Finley 1761-1766
    John Blair 1767-1768
  6. Reverend John Witherspoon 1768-1794
  7. Reverend Samuel Stanhope Smith 1795-1812
  8. Reverend Ashbel Green 1812-1822
    Philip Lindsley 1822-1823
  9. Reverend James Carnahan 1823-1854
  10. Reverend John Maclean, Jr. 1854-1868
  11. Reverend James McCosh 1868-1888
  12. Reverend Francis L. Patton 1888-1902
  13. Woodrow Wilson 1902-1910
    John Aikman Stewart 1910-1912
  14. John Grier Hibben 1912-1932
    Edward Dickinson Duffield 1932-1933
  15. Harold W. Dodds 1933-1957
  16. Robert F. Goheen 1957-1972
  17. William G. Bowen 1972-1988
  18. Harold T. Shapiro 1988-2001
  19. Shirley M. Tilghman 2001-2013
  20. Christopher L. Eisgruber 2013-

References

  1. ^ Axtell, James (2006). The Making of Princeton University: From Woodrow Wilson to the Present. Princeton University Press. p. 330.  
  2. ^ Leitch, Alexander (1978). A Princeton Companion. Princeton University Press. 
  3. ^ "Prospect House History". Princeton University. 
  4. ^ http://etcweb.princeton.edu/CampusWWW/Companion/university_president.html

External links

  • The Presidents of Princeton University
  • A Princeton Companion page on the office
  • Photographic tour of Princeton Cemetery.
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