World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Presyncope

Article Id: WHEBN0023882484
Reproduction Date:

Title: Presyncope  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Syncope (medicine), Disequilibrium (medicine), Hypergeusia, Convulsion, Hypogeusia
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Presyncope

Presyncope
Classification and external resources
DiseasesDB 27303
MeSH D013575

Presyncope is a state consisting of lightheadedness,[1] muscular weakness, blurred vision, and feeling faint (as opposed to a syncope, which is actually fainting). Pre-syncope is most often cardiovascular in etiology. In many patients, lightheadedness is a symptom of orthostatic hypotension. Orthostatic hypotension occurs when blood pressure drops significantly when the patient stands from a supine or sitting position. If loss of consciousness occurs in this situation, it is termed syncope.

Presyncope is frequently reported in patients with forms of Dysautonomia such as the Postural Tachycardia Syndrome.

Clinical test

The tilt table test is an evaluative clinical test to help identify postural hypotension, a common cause of presyncope or syncope.[2] A tilt angle of 60 and 70 degrees is optimal and maintains a high degree of specificity.[2] A positive sign with the tilt table test must be taken in context of patient history, with consideration of pertinent clinical findings before coming to a conclusion.

See also

References

  1. ^ Reeves, Alexander G; Rand S. Swenson. "Chapter 14: Evaluation of the Dizzy Patient". Disorders of the nervous system: a primer. Dartmouth Medical School. Retrieved 2012-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b Natale, A., Akhtar, M., Jazayeri, M., Dhala, A., Blanck, Z., Deshpande, S., et al. (1995). Provocation of Hypotension During Head-Up Tilt Testing in Subjects With No History of Syncope or Presyncop. American Heart Association, (92), 54-58. doi: 10.1161/01.CIR.92.1.54; url: http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/92/1/54.full


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.