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Reconnaissance Corps

The Reconnaissance Corps
The tactical recognition flash of the 1st The Queen's Dragoon Guards is identical to the badge of the Reconnaissance Corps, except for the absence of the ribbon bearing the Corps' name
Active 1941-1946
Country  United Kingdom
Branch Army
Role Reconnaissance
Nickname The Reccies
Motto "Only The Enemy In Front"

The Reconnaissance Corps, or simply Recce Corps, was a Second World War corps of the British Army whose units provided the mobile spearhead of infantry divisions. It was formed from infantry brigade reconnaissance groups on 14 January 1941.

All the brigade reconnaissance groups of each infantry corps were formed into reconnaissance battalions, each usually bearing the number of its relevant division. For example, the 43rd Battalion, Reconnaissance Corps (based on the 5th Battalion, the Gloucestershire Regiment) was the divisional reconnaissance battalion of the 43rd (Wessex) Infantry Division.[1]

Initially, coming from infantry units, reconnaissance units used the infantry designations of battalions, companies and platoons. However, from 6 June 1942, the Corps changed to the cavalry descriptions of regiments, squadrons and troops.[2]

It became part of the Royal Armoured Corps in 1944, still maintaining its own cap badge with two lightning strikes supporting an upright spear. With the end of the war, this number of reconnaissance units was not needed and the Corps was disbanded in August 1946. Reconnaissance duties reverted to regular armoured units of the Royal Armoured Corps.

Contents

  • Organisation and equipment 1
  • Units 2
  • Notes 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Organisation and equipment

Unit sign used to identify all reconnaissance vehicles

The Reconnaissance Corps was charged with gathering vital tactical information in battle for infantry divisions, probing ahead and screening the flanks of main advances. The training centre was established at Humber Light Reconnaissance Car and with Bren Gun Carriers. The assault troop comprised lorried infantry and were called up when enemy resistance needed to be overcome. Later in the war more efficient and well-armed armoured cars such as the Humber Armoured Car, Daimler Armoured Car, Staghound and Greyhound augmented the light reconnaissance cars in scout troops.[3]

Units

The following units served in the Recce Corps:

Independent reconnaissance squadrons (this list is probably incomplete)

Notes

  1. ^ Land Forces of Britain, the Empire and CommonwealthMills, T.F. 5th Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment page. Retrieved 26 November 2007.
  2. ^ "Reconnaissance Corps (UK)". web.archive.org. 2013. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  3. ^ A British Soldier Remembers The Logistics of a Recce Regiment (organisation and vehicles pages).
  4. ^ "1st Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  5. ^ Joslen p. 39.
  6. ^ "2nd Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  7. ^ "3rd (RNF) Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  8. ^ a b "4th Bn, Royal Northumberland Fusiliers: war services". web.archive.org. 2013. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  9. ^ "4th Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  10. ^ "5th Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Reconnaissance Regiments RAC 1939-1945". web.archive.org. 2013. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  12. ^ Joslen, p. 121.
  13. ^ "15th (Scottish) Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  14. ^ "18th Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  15. ^ a b c d "38th (Welsh) Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  16. ^ "43rd (Wessex) Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  17. ^ a b "161st (Green Howards) Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  18. ^ "5th Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment". web.archive.org. 2013. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  19. ^ a b Ellis Vol I, p. 275.
  20. ^ "44th Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  21. ^ "45th Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  22. ^ "46th Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  23. ^ a b c d "49th (WR) Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  24. ^ Joslen, p. 81.
  25. ^ "50th Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  26. ^ "51st (H) Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  27. ^ "52nd (Lowland) Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  28. ^ "53rd (Welsh) Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  29. ^ a b c d e "54th Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  30. ^ "56th Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  31. ^ "59th Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  32. ^ Ellis Vol I, pp. 453 & 530.
  33. ^ "61st Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  34. ^ "The Reconnaissance Training Centre". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  35. ^ Joslen, p. 103.
  36. ^ a b c d "80th Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  37. ^ "81st (WA) Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  38. ^ "82nd (WA) Reconnaissance Regiment". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  39. ^ Joslen, p. 90.
  40. ^ Joslen, p. 73.
  41. ^ "2nd Derbyshire Yeomanry". recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  42. ^ "The Derbyshire Yeomanry (UK)". web.archive.org. 2013. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  43. ^ a b "Reconnaissance Corps: Service of Airborne Units". web.archive.org. 2013. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  44. ^ Ellis Vol I, p. 527.
  45. ^ """The G.H.Q. Liason Regiment "Phantom. recce.adsl24.co.uk. 2009. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  46. ^ Ellis Vol I, p. 523.
  47. ^ Ryan pp. 16 & 124.
  48. ^ Ellis Vol II, pp. 35, 46.
  49. ^ Joslen p. 77.
  50. ^ Joslen, p. 333.

References

  •  
  • Doherty, Richard & Chapman, Rob (2007). The British Reconnaissance Corps in World War II. Oxford:  
  • Ellis, L.F. (1962). The Battle of Normandy.  
  • Ellis, L.F. (1968). The Defeat of Germany.  
  • Howard, Roy (2004). Beaten Paths are Safest: From D-Day to the Ardennes. Memories of the 61st Reconnaissance Regiment.  
  • Joslen, Lt-Col H.F. (2003) [1st. pub.  
  • Parlour, Andy; Parlour, Sue (2004). Phantom at War. Bristol: Cerberus Publishing Ltd.  
  •  
  • Taylor, Jeremy L. (1947). This Band of Brothers: a history of the Reconnaissance Corps of the British Army. Bristol: White Swan Press. 
  • Tee, Ronald Arthur (2001). A British soldier remembers. Belleville, Ontario: Epic Press. 

External links

  • Land Forces of Britain, the Empire and Commonwealth
  • The Reconnaissance Corps website
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