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Speedweeks

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Title: Speedweeks  
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Speedweeks

Budweiser Speedweeks

Budweiser Speedweeks[1] is a series of racing events that take place during January and February at the Daytona International Speedway. The events lead up to and conclude with the Daytona 500.

Nearby tracks New Smyrna Speedway and Volusia County Speedway also run special events during the period.

Contents

  • January 1
  • 24 Hours of Daytona 2
  • Daytona 500 week 3
    • Friday 3.1
    • Saturday 3.2
    • Sunday 3.3
    • Wednesday 3.4
    • Thursday 3.5
    • Friday 3.6
    • Saturday 3.7
    • Sunday 3.8
  • History 4
    • Former names 4.1
    • Former events during Speedweeks 4.2
  • See also 5
  • References 6

January

Through 2014, Speedweeks informally kicked off in early January with off-season testing at Daytona. The NASCAR Sprint Cup Series and Xfinity Series regularly conducted annual preseason tests on the 2.5 mi (4.0 km) oval, under the moniker "Preseason Thunder". For 2015, the January test sessions was cancelled as part of NASCAR's overall ban on private testing.[2]

Also in early January, the United SportsCar Championship conducts a test session on the Daytona road course, in preparations for the Rolex 24. It is nicknamed the "Roar Before the 24."[3]

24 Hours of Daytona

The first major event of Speedweeks is the Rolex 24. Currently it is held the final weekend of January, which is also the bye week for the Super Bowl. This weekend has been specifically chosen to avoid conflict with the Super Bowl. Events during the weekend include:

Daytona 500 week

Following the Rolex 24, there is no track activity for two weeks. This prevents a conflict with the Super Bowl. During this time, track officials clean the track and make final preparations for the arrival of stock cars.

The highlight of Speedweeks are the nine days leading up to and including the Daytona 500. It begins the weekend prior to the Daytona 500, and ends with the race itself. Currently the Daytona 500 is scheduled for the last Sunday in February.

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

History

2010 Speedweeks logo

In 2004, the Hershey Kisses 300 was stopped on Saturday for rain. The race couldn't continue on Sunday due to the 46th running of the Daytona 500. The race was completed on Monday, with Dale Earnhardt, Jr. winning both the Busch Series race and Cup race in the same weekend.

In 2005, a 5K run was added to the Speedweeks schedule, as part of the Rolex 24.

In 2007, the IndyCar Series hosted an open test on the road course configuration during the week after the Rolex 24. No race was scheduled, however.

In 2012, the Daytona 500 was postponed for the first time in race history.

Former names

Former events during Speedweeks

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Newton, David (February 24, 2012). "Next year's Daytona 500 is Feb. 24".  
  2. ^ NASCAR’s testing ban will include Daytona’s Preseason Thunder
  3. ^ Roar Before the Rolex 24 to move back a week in 2015
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