World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Straight-seven engine

Article Id: WHEBN0031104249
Reproduction Date:

Title: Straight-seven engine  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Flat-ten engine, Flat-sixteen engine, V3 engine, Cam, Split-single
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Straight-seven engine

A straight-seven engine or inline-seven engine is a straight engine with seven cylinders. Wärtsilä, with their RTA96-C, and MAN Diesel produce crosshead two-stroke diesel engines in this configuration.[1][2] Wärtsilä also produces regular trunk engines in this configuration.[3] It is more common in marine applications because marine engines are usually based on a modular design, with individual heads per cylinder.

Only one straight-seven engine for land propulsion is known to be in production, the AGCO Sisu 7-cylinder diesel engine.[4] This engine configuration was chosen because of size, parts commonality, and power range issues. A straight-8 would be too long for the farm machinery application the engine was intended for, whilst a V engine would require a higher investment compared to the expected low sales volume for this power range. The straight-7 configuration is a lower investment because Sisu has reused cylinder heads from their I3 and I4 diesel lineups. This is possible because the cylinder volume, pistons and con rods are identical across the Sisu model range.[5]

Notes

  1. ^ Wärtsilä RT-flex 82T
  2. ^ MAN Diesel Marine Engine IMO Tier I Programme
  3. ^ Wärtsilä 32
  4. ^ 7-Cylinder - AGCO Sisu Power
  5. ^ AGCO SISU POWER launched new innovative 7-cylinder 9,8 litre engine


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.