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Tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone

 

Tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone

Tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(3α,5β)-3,21-dihydroxypregnan-20-one
Clinical data
Legal status
?
Identifiers
CAS number  YesY
ATC code ?
PubChem
Synonyms THDOC
Chemical data
Formula C21H34O3 
Mol. mass 334.493 g/mol
 YesY   

Tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (abbreviated as THDOC; 3α,21-dihydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one), also referred to as allotetrahydrocorticosterone, is an endogenous neurosteroid.[1] It is synthesized from the adrenal hormone deoxycorticosterone by the action of two enzymes, 5α-reductase type I and 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.[2] THDOC is a potent positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor, and has sedative, anxiolytic and anticonvulsant effects.[3][4][5] Changes in the normal levels of this steroid particularly during pregnancy and menstruation may be involved in some types of epilepsy (catamenial epilepsy) and premenstrual syndrome,[6] as well as stress, anxiety and depression.[7][8][9][10][11]

See also

References

  1. ^ Hosie, AM; Wilkins, ME; Da Silva, HM; Smart, TG (2006). "Endogenous neurosteroids regulate GABAA receptors through two discrete transmembrane sites". Nature 444 (7118): 486–9.  
  2. ^ Agís-Balboa, RC; Pinna, G; Zhubi, A; Maloku, E; Veldic, M; Costa, E; Guidotti, A (2006). "Characterization of brain neurons that express enzymes mediating neurosteroid biosynthesis". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103 (39): 14602–7.  
  3. ^ Kokate, TG; Svensson, BE; Rogawski, MA (1994). "Anticonvulsant activity of neurosteroids: Correlation with gamma-aminobutyric acid-evoked chloride current potentiation". J. Pharmacol. Exper. Therapeut. 270 (3): 1223–9.  
  4. ^ Reddy, DS; Rogawski, MA (2002). "Stress-induced deoxycorticosterone-derived neurosteroids modulate GABA(A) receptor function and seizure susceptibility". J. Neurosci. 22 (9): 3795–805.  
  5. ^ Reddy, DS (2003). "Pharmacology of endogenous neuroactive steroids". Crit. Rev. Neurobiol. 15 (3–4): 197–234.  
  6. ^ Tuveri, A; Paoletti, AM; Orrù, M; Melis, GB; Marotto, MF; Zedda, P; Marrosu, F; Sogliano, C; Marra, C; Biggio, G; Concas, A (2008). "Reduced serum level of THDOC, an anticonvulsant steroid, in women with perimenstrual catamenial epilepsy". Epilepsia 49 (7): 1221–9.  
  7. ^ Reddy, DS (2003). "Is there a physiological role for the neurosteroid THDOC in stress-sensitive conditions?". Trends Pharmacol. Sci. 24 (3): 103–6.  
  8. ^ Reddy, DS (2006). "Physiological role of adrenal deoxycorticosterone-derived neuroactive steroids in stress-sensitive conditions". Neuroscience 138 (3): 911–20.  
  9. ^ Eser, D; Romeo, E; Baghai, TC; Di Michele, F; Schüle, C; Pasini, A; Zwanzger, P; Padberg, F; Rupprecht, R (2006). "Neuroactive steroids as modulators of depression and anxiety". Neuroscience 138 (3): 1041–8.  
  10. ^ Eser, D; Schüle, C; Baghai, TC; Romeo, E; Rupprecht, R (2006). "Neuroactive steroids in depression and anxiety disorders: Clinical studies". Neuroendocrinology 84 (4): 244–54.  
  11. ^ Maguire, J; Mody, I (2007). "Neurosteroid synthesis-mediated regulation of GABA(A) receptors: Relevance to the ovarian cycle and stress". J. Neurosci. 27 (9): 2155–62.  



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