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The Brothers Cazimero

 

The Brothers Cazimero

The Brothers Cazimero are a Hawaiian musical duo made up of Robert Cazimero on bass and Roland Cazimero on twelve string guitar. Robert also plays piano as a solo musician. The Cazimeros got their start during the Hawaiian Renaissance with ukulele and slack-key guitarist Peter Moon's band, The Sunday Manoa, on their first recording, Guava Jam. Since that time, The Brothers Cazimero have released at least 36 recordings and three DVDs. For three decades, the group performed at the annual Lei Day Concert.

The Hawai'i Academy of Recording Arts (HARA) has honored the Cazimeros with 25 Na Hoku Hanohano Awards. Robert and Roland have also received individual Hoku Awards as solo artists. The Cazimeros' album Some Call It Aloha...Don't Tell was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Hawaiian Music Album in 2005. In 2006, they were inducted into the Hawaiian Music Hall of Fame.

In 1991, Roland joined Henry Kapono Kaaihue, Israel "Iz" Kamakawiwo'ole and Cyril Pahinui in recording "Broken Promise", a Hawaiian mele ku'e (song of protest) written by Kaaihue. The project won two Hoku Awards -- "Song of the Year" and "Single of the Year" -- in 1992.

Robert Cazimero is also a kumu hula (teacher of hula) for the hālau hula (a contemporary translation is "hula school") Halau Na Kamalei. Members of the halau have often performed with Robert and Roland as dancers and as a choral group. The Brothers are featured (with 3 songs) on the audio track for the Over Hawaii documentary which was broadcast on public television stations in 2012.

Select discography

  • The Brothers Cazimero, Music of Polynesia MOP 38000

External links

  • Mountain Apple Company website, mountainapplecompany.com; accessed October 25, 2014.
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