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The Holocaust in Luxembourg

 

The Holocaust in Luxembourg

A Nazi parade by the Synagogue in Luxembourg in 1941. It was destroyed in 1943.

The Holocaust in Luxembourg refers to the persecution and near-annihilation of the 3,500-strong Jewish population of Luxembourg begun shortly after the start of the German occupation during World War II, when the country was officially incorporated into Nazi Germany. The persecution lasted until October 1941, when the Germans declared the territory to be free of Jews who had been deported to extermination camps and ghettos in Eastern Europe.

Contents

  • History 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • Further reading 4
  • External links 5

History

Before the war, Luxembourg had a population of about 3,500 Jews, many of them newly arrived in the country to escape persecution in Germany.[1] The Nuremberg Laws, which had applied in Germany since 1935, were enforced in Luxembourg from September 1940 and Jews were encouraged to leave the country for Vichy France.[1] Emigration was forbidden in October 1941, but not before nearly 2,500 had fled.[1] In practice they were little better off in Vichy France, and many of those who left were later deported and killed. From September 1941, all Jews in Luxembourg were forced to wear the yellow Star of David badge to identify them.[2]

From October 1941, Nazi authorities began to deport the around 800 remaining Jews from Luxembourg to Łódź Ghetto and the concentration camps at Theresienstadt and Auschwitz.[1] Around 700 were deported from the Transit Camp at Fuenfbrunnen in Ulflingen in the north of Luxembourg.[1]

Luxembourg was declared "Judenrein" ("cleansed of Jews") except for those in hiding[2] on 19 October 1941.[3] Of the original Jewish population of Luxembourg, only 36 are known to have survived the war.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f
  2. ^ a b
  3. ^

Further reading

  • Cerf, Paul. L'étoile juive au Luxembourg. Luxembourg: Editions RTL, 1986.

External links


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