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Tooth gemination

 

Tooth gemination

Tooth gemination
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 K00.2
ICD-9-CM 520.2

Tooth gemination is a dental phenomenon that appears to be two teeth developed from one. There is one main crown with a cleft in it that, within the cervical third of the crown, looks like two teeth, though it is not two teeth. The number of the teeth in the arch will be normal.

Description

The phenomenon of gemination arises when two teeth develop from one tooth bud and, as a result, the patient has an extra tooth, in contrast to fusion, where the patient would appear to be missing one tooth. Fused teeth arise through union of two normally separated tooth germs, and depending upon the stage of development of the teeth at the time of union, it may be either complete or incomplete. On some occasions, two independent pulp chambers and root canals can be seen. However, fusion can also be the union of a normal tooth bud to a supernumerary tooth germ. In these cases, the number of teeth is also normal and differentiation from gemination may be very difficult, if not impossible. In geminated teeth, division is usually incomplete and results in a large tooth crown that has a single root and a single canal. Both gemination and fusion are prevalent in primary dentition, with incisors being more affected.

Related abnormalities of the dentition

References

  • Peirera AJ, Fidel RA, Fidel SR. Maxillary Lateral Incisor with Two Root Canals: Fusion, Gemination or Dens invaginatus? Braz Dent J (2000) 11(2): 141-146.
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