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United States Senate elections, 1802 and 1803

 

United States Senate elections, 1802 and 1803

United States Senate elections, 1802

Dates vary by state

11 of the 34 seats in the United States Senate (plus special elections)
18 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic-Republican Federalist
Last election 15 seats (45.5%) 17 seats (54.5%)
Seats before 17 (53.1%) 15 (46.9%)
Seats won 22 (71.0%) 9 (39.0%)
Seat change Increase 5 Decrease 6
Seats up 2 9

Majority party before election

Democratic-Republican

Elected Majority party

Democratic-Republican

The United States Senate elections of 1802 and 1803 were elections for the United States Senate which had the Democratic-Republican Party assume an overwhelming control thereof.

As this election was prior to ratification of the seventeenth amendment, Senators were chosen by State legislatures.

Contents

  • Change in Senate composition 1
    • Before the elections 1.1
    • Beginning of the 8th Congress 1.2
  • Complete list of races in 1802 and 1803 2
    • Special elections during the 7th Congress 2.1
    • Races leading to the 8th Congress 2.2
    • Special elections during the 8th Congress 2.3
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Change in Senate composition

Before the elections

DR7 DR6 DR5 DR4 DR3 DR2 DR1
DR8 DR9 DR10 DR11 DR12 DR13 DR14 DR15 DR16 V1
Majority → DR17
F8 F9 F10 F11 F12 F13 F14 F15 V2
F7 F6 F5 F4 F3 F2 F1

Beginning of the 8th Congress

DR7 DR6 DR5 DR4 DR3 DR2 DR1
DR8 DR9 DR10 DR11 DR12 DR13 DR14 DR15 DR16 V1
Majority →
F8 F9O V3 DR22+ DR21+ DR20+ DR19+ DR18+ DR17 V2
F7 F6 F5 F4 F3 F2 F1
Key:
DR# Democratic-Republican
F# Federalist
V# Vacant
Party hold: Incumbent re-elected
O Party hold: New senator elected from same party
+ Party gain: New senator elected from different party
No tag Seat not up for election this time

Complete list of races in 1802 and 1803

Special elections during the 7th Congress

In these special elections, the winner was seated before March 4, 1803; ordered by election date.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
New York
(Class 3)
John Armstrong, Jr. Democratic-Republican 1801 (Special) Incumbent resigned February 5, 1802.
Winner was elected February 23, 1802 to finish the term ending March 4, 1807.
Democratic-Republican hold.
DeWitt Clinton (Democratic-Republican)
New Hampshire
(Class 3)
James Sheafe (F) Federalist 1801 Incumbent resigned June 14, 1802.
Winner was elected June 17, 1802 to finish the term ending March 4, 1807.
Federalist hold.
William Plumer (Federalist)
South Carolina
(Class 3)
John E. Colhoun Democratic-Republican 1800 Incumbent died October 26, 1802.
Winner was elected November 4, 1802 to finish the term ending March 4, 1807.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Pierce Butler (Democratic-Republican)

Races leading to the 8th Congress

In these general elections, the winner was seated on March 4, 1803; ordered by state.

All of the elections involved the Class 1 seats.
State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Connecticut James Hillhouse Federalist 1796 Incumbent re-elected James Hillhouse (Federalist)
Delaware Samuel White Federalist 1801 (Special) Incumbent re-elected Samuel White (Federalist)
Maryland John E. Howard Federalist 1796 (Special)
1796

Democratic-Republican gain
Samuel Smith (Democratic-Republican)
Massachusetts Jonathan Mason Federalist 1800 (Special)
Federalist hold.
John Quincy Adams (Federalist)
New Jersey Aaron Ogden Federalist 1801 (Special) Lost re-election.
Legislature failed to elect and term began with the seat vacant
Federalist loss.
None.
New York Gouverneur Morris Federalist 1800 (Special) Incumbent lost re-election.
Democratic-Republican gain
Theodorus Bailey (Democratic-Republican)
Pennsylvania James Ross Federalist 1794 (Special)
1797

Democratic-Republican gain
Samuel Maclay (Democratic-Republican)
Rhode Island Theodore Foster Federalist 1796 Incumbent retired.
Winner elected in 1803.
Democratic-Republican gain
Samuel J. Potter (Democratic-Republican)
Tennessee Joseph Anderson Democratic-
Republican
1799 (Special) Incumbent re-elected. Joseph Anderson (Democratic-Republican)
Vermont Nathaniel Chipman Federalist 1797 (Special) Incumbent lost re-election.
Winner elected in 1803.
Democratic-Republican gain
Israel Smith (Democratic-Republican)
Virginia Stevens Mason Democratic-
Republican
1794 (Special)
1797
Incumbent re-elected. Stevens Mason (Democratic-Republican)

Special elections during the 8th Congress

In this special election, the winner was seated in 1803 some time after March 4.
State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Ohio
(Class 1)
New seat Ohio joined the Union in 1803.
Winner was elected April 1, 1803 to finish the term ending March 4, 1809.
Democratic-Republican gain.
John Smith (Democratic-Republican)
Ohio
(Class 3)
New seat Ohio joined the Union in 1803.
Winner was elected April 1, 1803 to finish the term ending March 4, 1807.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Thomas Worthington (Democratic-Republican)
New Jersey
(Class 1)
John Condit Democratic-Republican 1803 (Appointed) Legislature had failed to elect, leaving the seat vacant at the beginning of the Congress.
Condit was then appointed September 1, 1803 to continue the term.
He was then elected October 1, 1803 to finish the term ending March 4, 1809.[1]
John Condit (Democratic-Republican)
Virginia
(Class 1)
John Taylor Democratic-Republican 1792 (Special)
1793
Predecessor Stevens T. Mason (DR) had died May 10, 1803, having just begun the new term.
Interim appointee served from June 4, 1803, and did not seek election to finish the term.
Winner was elected December 7, 1803 to finish the term ending March 4, 1809.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Abraham B. Venable (Democratic-Republican)

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/CandidateDetail.html?CandidateID=112577
  • Party Division in the Senate, 1789-Present, via Senate.gov
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