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V18 engine

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Title: V18 engine  
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Subject: V engine, Multi-cylinder engine, V18, Piston engine configurations, Flat-ten engine
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V18 engine

An ALCO 18-251 V18 engine, used as a backup generator at a wastewater plant in Montreal.

A V18 engine is a V engine with 18 cylinders. A rare configuration not used in automobiles, large V18 diesel engines have seen limited use in mining, electricity generation, rail transport, and marine propulsion.

Examples of V18 engines

Name Displacement Power output Fuel Notes
ALCO 18-251[1] 12,024 cu in (197.04 l) 4,500 hp (3.36 MW) Diesel Originally designed and manufactured by
American Locomotive Company; now manufactured by
Fairbanks Morse Engine.[1]
Cummins QSK78[2] 4,735 cu in (77.59 l) 3,500 hp (2.61 MW) Diesel Derived from the V16 QSK60.[2]
Marketed by Komatsu as the SSDA18V170.[3]
Wärtsilä 18V50DF[4] 125,000 cu in (2,050 l) 23,530 hp (17.55 MW) Diesel or
natural gas
Available for both marine propulsion and power generation, and used in e.g. Humboldt Bay power station.[5]

Vehicles powered by V18 engines

Name Description Engine
Belaz 75600 haul truck Cummins QSK78
Liebherr T 282B haul truck Cummins QSK78
Komatsu 960E-1 haul truck Komatsu SSDA18V170
MLW M640 diesel-electric locomotive ALCO 18-251

References

  1. ^ a b "Power Solutions: 251 Diesel Engines" (PDF). Fairbanks Morse Engine. Retrieved 26 June 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "Cummins QSK78". Cummins. Retrieved 25 June 2011. 
  3. ^ "New Engine - Rated 3500 horsepower at any altitude". MINExpo Report. Retrieved 26 June 2011. 
  4. ^ "Wärtsilä 50DF". Wärtsilä. Retrieved 22 October 2011. 
  5. ^ Humboldt Bay, USA Power Plant Wartsila 18V50DF Natural Gas. Industrial Marine Power Forum. Retrieved 2011-10-22.
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