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Virginia's congressional districts

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Title: Virginia's congressional districts  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Index of Virginia-related articles, Northern Virginia, Virginia, Virginia's 4th congressional district, Virginia's 6th congressional district
Collection: Congressional Districts of Virginia
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Virginia's congressional districts

Virginia's congressional districts since 2013[1]

Virginia is currently divided into 11 congressional districts, each represented by a member of the United States House of Representatives. The number of Virginia's districts remained unchanged after the 2010 Census.

Contents

  • Current districts and representatives 1
  • Apportionment 2
  • List of districts 3
    • Current 3.1
    • Former 3.2
  • Historical and present district boundaries 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6

Current districts and representatives

List of members of the Virginian United States House delegation, their terms, their district boundaries, and the districts' political rating according to the CPVI. The delegation has a total of 11 members, with 8 Republicans and 3 Democrats. The 7th district was most recently represented by Republican Eric Cantor, who resigned to become a chairman for Moelis & Company, a New York investment bank.[2]

District Representative Party CPVI Incumbency District map
1st Rob Wittman (R-Manassas) Republican R+8 December 11, 2007 – present
2nd Scott Rigell (R-Virginia Beach) Republican R+2 January 3, 2011 – present
3rd Robert Scott (D-Richmond) Democratic D+27 January 3, 1993 – present
4th Randy Forbes (R-Chesapeake) Republican R+4 June 19, 2001 – present
5th Robert Hurt (R-Chatham) Republican R+5 January 3, 2011 – present
6th Bob Goodlatte (R-Roanoke) Republican R+12 January 3, 1993 – present
7th Dave Brat (R (Glen Allen) Republican R+10 November 4, 2014 – present
8th Don Beyer (D-Alexandria) Democratic D+16 January 3, 2015 – present
9th Salem) Republican R+15 January 3, 2011 – present
10th Barbara Comstock (R-McLean) Republican R+2 January 3, 2015 – present
11th Gerry Connolly (D-Arlington) Democratic D+10 January 3, 2009 – present

Apportionment

Elections held in the year of a census use the apportionment determined by the previous census.

1789 1790 1800
10[3] 19 22
1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900
23 22 21 15 13 11 9[4] 10 10 10
1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000
10 10 9 9 10 10 10 10 11 11
2010
11

List of districts

Historical and present district boundaries

Table of United States congressional district boundary maps in the State of Virginia, presented chronologically.[16] All redistricting events that took place in Virginia between 1973 and 2013 are shown.

Year Statewide map Norfolk highlight
1973 – 1982
1983 – 1992
1993 – 1994
1995 – 1998
1999 – 2002
2003 – 2013
Since 2013


See also

References

  1. ^ "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Retrieved February 2, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Moelis & Company Press Release (Sept 2, 2014)". Retrieved 19 September 2014. 
  3. ^ Represents apportionment assigned by the U.S. Constitution in 1789 until the first U.S. Census.
  4. ^ West Virginia was formed out of portions of Virginia in 1863.
  5. ^ US Census. "My Congressional District (estimates)". US Census. Retrieved 2014-04-21. 
  6. ^ US Census. "My Congressional District (estimates)". US Census. Retrieved 2014-04-21. 
  7. ^ US Census. "My Congressional District (estimates)". US Census. Retrieved 2014-04-21. 
  8. ^ US Census. "My Congressional District (estimates)". US Census. Retrieved 2014-04-21. 
  9. ^ US Census. "My Congressional District (estimates)". US Census. Retrieved 2014-04-21. 
  10. ^ US Census. "My Congressional District (estimates)". US Census. Retrieved 2014-04-21. 
  11. ^ US Census. "My Congressional District (estimates)". US Census. Retrieved 2014-04-21. 
  12. ^ US Census. "My Congressional District (estimates)". US Census. Retrieved 2014-04-21. 
  13. ^ US Census. "My Congressional District (estimates)". US Census. Retrieved 2014-04-21. 
  14. ^ US Census. "My Congressional District (estimates)". US Census. Retrieved 2014-04-21. 
  15. ^ US Census. "My Congressional District (estimates)". US Census. Retrieved 2014-04-21. 
  16. ^ "Digital Boundary Definitions of United States Congressional Districts, 1789-2012.". Retrieved October 18, 2014. 
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