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Westlake, Ohio

Westlake, Ohio
City
Westlake Porter Public Library
Westlake Porter Public Library
Official seal of Westlake, Ohio
Seal
Location in Cuyahoga County and the state of Ohio.
Location in Cuyahoga County and the state of Ohio.
Location of Ohio in the United States
Location of Ohio in the United States
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Ohio
County Cuyahoga
Dover Township first settled October 10, 1810
Dover Village incorporated 1911 [1]
City of Westlake incorporated 1957 [1]
Government
 • Type Mayor-council
 • Mayor Dennis M. Clough (R) [2]
Area[3]
 • Total 15.93 sq mi (41.26 km2)
 • Land 15.93 sq mi (41.26 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation 710 ft (216 m)
Population (2010)[4]
 • Total 32,729
 • Estimate (2012[5]) 32,487
 • Density 2,054.6/sq mi (793.3/km2)
  census
Time zone EST (UTC-4)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Zip code 44145
Area code(s) 440
FIPS code 39-83622[6]
GNIS feature ID 1061762[7]
Website http://www.cityofwestlake.org

Westlake is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. The population was 32,729 at the 2010 census. It is an affluent suburb of Cleveland located 12 miles west of downtown Cleveland.

Contents

  • Geography 1
  • Demographics 2
    • 2010 census 2.1
    • 2000 census 2.2
  • History 3
  • Economy 4
    • Top employers 4.1
  • Schools 5
  • Points of interest 6
  • Crocker Park 7
  • Events 8
  • Notable people 9
  • Sister cities 10
  • References 11
  • External links 12

Geography

Westlake is located at (41.454439, -81.928657).[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 15.93 square miles (41.26 km2), all land.[3]

Demographics

The median income for a household in the city was $64,963, and the median income for a family was $81,223 (these figures had changed to $63,252 and $90,397 respectively as of a 2007 estimate).[13] Males had a median income of $60,429 versus $36,999 for females. The per capita income for the city was $37,142. About 1.3% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.7% of those under age 18 and 2.8% of those age 65 or over. Of the city's population over the age of 25, 50.1% hold a bachelor's degree or higher.[14]

89.3% spoke English, 1.6% Arabic, 1.5% Spanish, 1.3% Greek, and 0.7% German and Chinese.[15]

2010 census

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 32,729 people, 13,870 households, and 8,443 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,054.6 inhabitants per square mile (793.3/km2). There were 14,843 housing units at an average density of 931.8 per square mile (359.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 91.2% White, 1.6% African American, 0.1% Native American, 4.9% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.6% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.5% of the population.

There were 13,870 households of which 26.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 39.1% were non-families. 34.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 3.01.

The median age in the city was 45 years. 21.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.8% were from 25 to 44; 31% were from 45 to 64; and 19% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.4% male and 52.6% female.

2000 census

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 31,760 people, 12,830 households, and 8,186 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,995.2 people per square mile (770.2/km²). There were 13,648 housing units at an average density of 858.5 per square mile (331.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 91.65% White, 0.95% African American, 1.36% Native American, 4.21% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, and 1.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.27% of the population.

There were 12,826 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.9% were married couples living together, 5.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.1% were non-families. 32.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.8% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 26.8% from 25 to 44, 26.6% from 45 to 54, and 18.2% who were 55 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.3 males.

History

The area now known as the city of Westlake was first settled on October 10, 1810. At the time, it was part of Dover Township.

In the early 1910s, the northern part of the township seceded to form Bay Village. In 1912, a southern portion left to join North Olmsted. The remaining township residents formed Dover Village in 1913, taking with it a portion of Olmsted Township.

Dover Village was renamed Westlake in 1940.[16] This was done to eliminate confusion with Dover, Ohio.[17] The village of Westlake became a city in 1957.[1] The Westlake Historical Society was formed to inform and educate others about the history of Dover/ Westlake.

In September 1966, a house in Westlake which had recently been bought by John R. Compton, a black pastor, was firebombed. No one was injured, although the bombing did cause around $10,000 of damage. According to the Cleveland Press, the mayor of Westlake, Alexander R. Roman, "criticized the parties involved in the sale of the home...He said no one was notified so the community could be prepared to accept a Negro family."[18][19]

Economy

Top employers

According to the City's 2014 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[20] the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 St. John Medical Center (University Hospitals of Cleveland) 1,526
2 Hyland Software 1,458
3 The Cheesecake Factory 679
4 Westlake City Schools 670
5 University Hospitals 492
6 TravelCenters of America 483
7 City of Westlake 441
8 Lutheran Home at Concord Reserve 427
9 Brookdale Westlake Village 413
10 Premier Physicians Centers 260

Schools

The Westlake City School District (WCS) is rated "excellent" by the state's report card for school districts. The WCS has been consistently rated "excellent" by the state since the cards came into existence. Westlake High School is home to WHBS-TV, the Westlake High school Broadcasting System. WHBS-TV is seen on channels 99 and 18 on AT&T U-Verse and WOW! cable, respectively, in the Westlake area. The station is considered one of the top high school television stations in the United States, and city voters recently rewarded the station with brand new, state-of-the-art television facilities added onto the high school as a result of the program's popularity. Lee Burneson Middle School has been awarded with a half-million dollar STEM grant. They have used this to buy equipment that will improve the learning process.

  • Bassett Elementary School (Grades Kindergarten-4)
  • Dover Elementary School (Grades Kindergarten-4)
  • Hillard Elementary School (Grades Preschool-4)
  • Holly Lane Elementary School (Grades Kindergarten-4)
  • Dover Intermediate School (Grades 5-6)
  • Lee Burneson Middle School (LBMS) (Grades 7-8)
  • Westlake High School (WHS) (Grades 9-12)
  • St. Paul Lutheran Church and School (Westlake) (Grades Preschool-8)

Points of interest

  • Westlake is served by the Westlake Porter Public Library.
  • Also found in Westlake is Lakewood Country Club, the 6th best private course in Northern Ohio.
  • Clague House Museum showcases the history of Westlake (formerly Dover). This house was built in 1876.
    Westlake Porter Public Library in 2008
  • Clague Playhouse; community theatre producing five plays a season from the classic and contemporary repertoire.
  • The White Oaks Restaurant was a lucrative Speakeasy during the American prohibition era.[21]
  • Dover Gardens Tavern was also a Speakeasy with an upstairs Ballroom during the American prohibition

Crocker Park

Crocker Park is a lifestyle center located on Crocker Road. It is essentially an outdoor mall with areas for recreation and socializing. The park is based on a small French town-type setting. There are also apartments and offices above some stores and restaurants. Townhouses are located on the southwest corner.

Events

  • Westlake hosted the 2006 USA Broomball National Championships, which included the first-ever national collegiate co-rec championship tournament for broomball, won by Clarkson University, and the first-ever women's national championship, won by Miami University.

Notable people

Sister cities

Westlake's first Sister City partnership with the Town of Tralee in Ireland was founded in 2009 and is recognized by Sister Cities International.

On March 8, 2012, the Windsor Star (of Windsor, Ontario, Canada) had reported that Westlake, and Kingsville, Ontario were considering twinning with each other, due to their proximity (separated by Lake Erie), cultural connections (Jack Miner set up his bird sanctuary in Kingsville, but was born in Westlake), and similar sizes and economic status.[24] On October 20, 2012, Westlake and Kingsville executed a Sister City alliance which is now recognized by Sister Cities International. Therefore, Westlake's second Sister City is that of the Town of Kingsville, Ontairo.

References

  1. ^ a b c About Our City
  2. ^ http://www.cityofwestlake.org/citygovernment/mayorsoffice.aspx Retrieved 31 December 2006.
  3. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  5. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  6. ^ a b c "American FactFinder".  
  7. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  13. ^ http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ADPTable?_bm=y&-context=adp&-qr_name=ACS_2007_3YR_G00_DP3YR3&-ds_name=ACS_2007_3YR_G00_&-tree_id=3307&-redoLog=true&-_caller=geoselect&-geo_id=16000US3983622&-format=&-_lang=en
  14. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/39/3983622.html
  15. ^ http://www.mla.org/map_data_results&state_id=39&place_id=83622&cty_id=
  16. ^ Mangus, Michael; Herman, Jennifer L. (2008). Ohio Encyclopedia. North American Book Dist LLC. p. 574.  
  17. ^ Stanton, Lysa; Pfister, Dave (August 8, 2011). "Dover becomes Westlake". Wetlake-Bay Village Observer. Retrieved August 11, 2014. 
  18. ^ "Silence about sale hit in home arson".  
  19. ^ "Burn cleric's $23,250 home in white suburb".  
  20. ^ City of Westlake CAFR
  21. ^ http://www.white-oaks.com/history.htm
  22. ^ Dawidziak, Mark (January 19, 2009). "'Lost' writer Brian K. Vaughan is a Cleveland native". Cleveland.com.
  23. ^ "Tralee Twins with Westlake, Ohio". 
  24. ^ http://www.windsorstar.com/news/Santos+wants+twin+with+Miner+hometown/6268582/story.html

External links

  • City of Westlake - Homepage
  • Westlake Porter Public Library
  • Westlake Historical Society
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